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Forts and Castles Topic

 
Fort Blakeley Marker with Redoubt #4 in background. image, Touch for more information
By Mark Hilton, April 6, 2019
Fort Blakeley Marker with Redoubt #4 in background.
GEOGRAPHIC SORT WITH USA FIRST
1Alabama (Baldwin County), Blakeley — Fort Blakeley (Fort Blakely*)
Fort Blakeley, named for the town which it surrounded, was one of two major Confederate defensive positions protecting eastern approaches to Mobile during the Civil War. The fort consisted of a nearly three mile long series of entrenchments anchored . . . Map (db m131891) HM
2Alabama (Baldwin County), Blakeley — The Battle of Fort Blakeley
You are standing on the site of the last grand charge of the Civil War, made during the Battle of Fort Blakeley on April 9. 1865. The battle was the climax of a months-long campaign that led ultimately to the capture of the city of Mobile by Union . . . Map (db m131890) HM
3Alabama (Baldwin County), Fort Morgan — Colors of Significance: Historic Flags of Mobile Point
Traditionally referred to as "colors', flags have long been used to identify nations, loyalties, and movements. As the sands have shifted through the ages, so too have the colors and loyalties of the Gulf Coast. Displayed here are a small section of . . . Map (db m118331) HM
4Alabama (Baldwin County), Fort Morgan — First Battle of Fort BowyerSeptember 14, 1814
American Forces 158 Men 20 Cannons Casualties 3 Killed; 5 Wounded British Forces 852 Men 130 Creek Indians 4 Ships; 80 Cannon 23 Killed; 47 Wounded On September 11, 1814, HMS Hermes, HMS . . . Map (db m118333) HM
5Alabama (Baldwin County), Fort Morgan — Fort Bowyer1813-1821
Drawn by A. Laccarriere Latour to accompany his book Historical Memoir of the War in West Florida and Louisiana, the above image depicts Fort Bowyer on the right as it appeared during the first battle in 1814. The drawing on the left; . . . Map (db m118335) HM
6Alabama (Baldwin County), Fort Morgan — Second Battle of Fort BowyerFebruary 8-12, 1815
American Forces 370 Men 28 Cannon Casualties 1 Killed; 18 Wounded British Forces 3000 Men 38 Ships 28 Cannon (not including those on ships) 13 Killed; 18 Wounded A map of the Second Battle of Fort . . . Map (db m118334) HM
7Alabama (Baldwin County), Fort Morgan — The Battery BaileyPosition of the 2nd Connecticut Light Artillery August 20-25, 1864
Construction began on August 19th on two artillery positions that were emplaced only 200 yards from the southeast bastion of Fort Morgan. These positions, which were part of Battery Bailey, anchored the southern flank of the Federal siege lines. . . . Map (db m118336) HM WM
8Alabama (Baldwin County), Fort Morgan — The Pride of Seven Flags
(East Face): Tribute dedicated to the memory of the soldiers who gave their lives in the defense of our country here at Fort Morgan. Here lies the pride of seven flags entombed in our ancestor’s worth, who heard the thunder of the fray . . . Map (db m4649) HM
9Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — "Damn The Torpedoes!" The Campaigns for Mobile, 1864 - 1865
(preface) "Damn the Torpedoes!" is a familiar battle cry, but there's more to the story! The Mobile Civil War Trail is your guide to military movements and the way of life on and around Mobile Bay in the closing two years of the Civil . . . Map (db m87247) HM
10Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Stop C4 — "The Shells Were Bursting All Around Us"The Siege of Fort Morgan: — Stop C4 —
After the surrender of Fort Gaines, U.S. General Gordon Granger prepared to besiege Fort Morgan. On August 9, 1864, he moved by transport to Navy Cove and debarked 2,000 men and his siege equipment at the Pilot Town wharf. By 2:00 p.m. he had . . . Map (db m87246) HM
11Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — 32 Pounder Sea Coast Defense GunOn Barbette Carriage
This smoothbore, muzzle-loading cannon was one of the main coast defense weapons in the United States' arsenal when Fort Morgan was completed in 1834. With an eight pound charge of powder the gun could fire a 32 pound solid iron shot about one . . . Map (db m87245) HM
12Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — 6.4” (100 pounder) Parrott Rifle / 7” Brooke Rifle
6.4” (100 pounder) Parrott Rifle Designed by Robert Parker Parrott at the outbreak of the Civil War, the Parrott Rifle became one of the most used rifled artillery pieces during the war. With shells that exploded on impact, rifled . . . Map (db m69898) HM
13Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Battery Dearborn (1900-1924)
Constructed between 1899 and 1900, the battery was named in honor of Major General Henry Dearborn, a Revolutionary War hero. The battery mounted eight 12” breech-loading mortars. Each mortar weighed 13 tons and was 11’ 9” long. The . . . Map (db m69919) HM
14Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Battery Schenck (1899-1923)
Battery Schenck, named for First Lieutenant William Schenck who was killed in action during the Philippine Insurrection, was the second rapid fire battery constructed at Fort Morgan. Completed on June 4, 1900, the battery would sit without guns for . . . Map (db m70058) HM
15Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Battery Thomas (1898-1917)
The first of two rapid fire gun batteries, Battery Thomas was named in honor of Captain Evan Thomas, 4th U.S. Artillery, who was killed in action with the Modoc Indians at Lava Beds, California in 1873. In March 1898, as the nation moved . . . Map (db m69826) HM
16Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Citadel (1825-1865)
The Citadel, a large ten sided brick and wood structure, once dominated the Fort’s parade ground. Completed in 1825 as a defensive barracks, it was capable of housing 400 soldiers. During the Union bombardment on August 22, 1864, the pine . . . Map (db m68751) HM
17Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Fort Bowyer War of 1812
At, or near, this site, the United States, after seizing this point of land from the Spanish in 1813, built Fort Bowyer, a structure of wood and sand. A small garrison of men courageously fought to defend the fort against two British attacks, one . . . Map (db m104017) HM
18Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Navy Cove / Pilot Town
Navy Cove The Mobile Bay shoreline just inside Mobile Point, close to Fort Morgan, is known as Navy Cove. This was the site of Native American villages for over two thousand years. The name came after the British Navy anchored here . . . Map (db m122441) HM
19Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Peace Magazine (1902-1924)
When Fort Morgan was modified between the 1890’s and early 1900’s, an allocation of $7,000.00 was made to build a “Peace” magazine. This building was the central storage area for the powder used by the fort’s guns. If war was expected, . . . Map (db m69917) HM
20Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Post Hospital Complex
On February 28, 1899, the U.S. Army completed construction of the post Hospital for the garrison of Fort Morgan. At a cost of $7,500.00, the original structure consisted of a two story modern medical facility that was heated by mineral oil. Due . . . Map (db m116935) HM
21Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — Stop C1 — The Battle of Mobile Bay“A Deadly Rain of Shot and Shell” — Civil War Trail, Battle for Mobile Bay —
Eager to attack Mobile Bay since 1862, U. S. Admiral David Farragut knew he could not capture control of the lower bay without the support of the army and without a flotilla of ironclad monitors to confront the Confederate ironclad CSS . . . Map (db m68815) HM
22Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — The Citadel(1821-1865)
The Citadel, a large ten sided brick and wood structure, once dominated the Fort’s parade ground. Capable of housing 400 soldiers, it served as a defensive barracks for the Fort’s garrison. During the Union bombardment of Fort Morgan on August . . . Map (db m92994) HM
23Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — The Overland CampaignStorm Clouds Gather — Civil War Trail, Battle for Mobile Bay —
To Wait and Watch In late August 1864 the Federals controlled Mobile Bay but could not attack Mobile. Admiral Farragut could not reach the city even with his light draft vessels, because the channels in the upper Bay had been obstructed. . . . Map (db m69909) HM
24Alabama (Baldwin County), Gulf Shores — U.S. Model 1918M1 155mm Gun and Model 1918A1 Carriage
The U.S. Model 1918M1 155mm Gun, more commonly known as the “G.P.F.”, was a French heavy artillery piece manufactured in the U.S. for use by the U.S. Army during World War I. Due to the gun’s mobility and hitting power, it was used . . . Map (db m69910) HM
25Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — 1st Division, U.S. Colored Troops
This earthen mound was part of a redoubt constructed by the 1st Division, U.S. Colored Troops in April, 1865. The regiment saw considerable action against Confederate warships protecting the Blakely River. These earthworks have been preserved as a . . . Map (db m100853) HM
26Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Confederate Redoubt No. 3 / Gibson’s Brigade
Confederate Redoubt No. 3 Capt. Cuthbert Slocomb of the 5th Company, Washington Artillery of New Orleans, commanded Redoubt No. 3, also known as Battery Blair, consisted of one 8-inch Columbiad, two 12-pound Napoleons, one 3-inch ordinance . . . Map (db m168270) HM
27Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Confederate Redoubt No. 5 / Ector's Brigade
Confederate Redoubt No. 5 Also called the Sandbag Battery, Redoubt No. 5 was originally commanded by Lt. Andrew Hargrove of Lumsden's Tuscaloosa Battery, Company F, 2nd Alabama Light Artillery Battalion. During the early stages of the . . . Map (db m168290) HM
28Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Fort McDermott
From this Confederate Fort 15 heavy artillery guns, repelled elements of 2 Union Army Corps, routed 5 ironclad monitors attacking up the Blakely River and for 13 days helped prevent the capture of Mobile until after General Lee's Surrender at . . . Map (db m100911) HM
29Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Fort McDermott
Highest point along 2 miles of Confederate battle lines extending east and north. Here 200 soldiers from Georgia, Louisiana & Arkansas, held off a numerically superior Union Force for thirteen days and nights in the last battle of the War Between . . . Map (db m100913) HM
30Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Ft. McDermott Confederate Memorial Park
Dedicated to the men of the Confederate States of America who valiantly fought for our American liberties, "Governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed... whenever any form of government becomes . . . Map (db m100936) HM
31Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Red Fort
Built of red clay, armed with 12 heavy guns and served by 307 crack Confederate Artilleryman from Batteries Perry (Tenn.) Phillips (Tenn.) Lumsden (Ala.) and Garrity (Mobile, Ala.). It was the keystone in the defense of Spanish Fort, 1865.Map (db m100868) HM
32Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Revolutionary War Battlefield and Burial Ground at Spanish Fort (1780-1781)
During the Revolutionary War, France, Spain, Britain, and the United States were interested in the fate of this region. In March 1780, Spanish forces captured Mobile. They established a palisaded fort with trenches (one mile north of here) to . . . Map (db m61451) HM
33Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Spanish Fort
Rendezvous for Indians, Spanish, French and English Explorers. In 1865, Three Confederate Brigades, outnumbered 10 to 1, engaged the Army of West Mississippi (Union Forces) in the last battle of the War Between the States. March 26~April 9, 1865.Map (db m100844) HM
34Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Spanish FortAlabama
Historic Spot of the Deep SouthMap (db m100845) HM
35Alabama (Baldwin County), Spanish Fort — Union Siege Battery No. 1
Near this site was the location of the first of twenty-two artillery positions the Union army set up to bombard the Confederate fortifications of Spanish Fort. The Confederate forces were under the command of Brig Gen. Randall Gibson. Battery Tracy, . . . Map (db m120331) HM
36Alabama (Baldwin County), Stockton — Fort Mims And The Creek Indian War, 1813-14
Front: In 1813, people on the United State’s southwestern frontier were fearful. The Redstick faction of the Creek Indian Nation opposed growing American influence in the area and had voted for war. However, Creeks living in the Tensaw . . . Map (db m116678) HM
37Alabama (Baldwin County), Stockton — The Society War of 1812 in the State of Alabama
The American Revolution gave the United States its independence but the War of 1812 gave it status among the nations and established permanent peace with Great Britain. Alabama had a significant role during the War of 1812. The Creek Indian . . . Map (db m122670) HM
38Alabama (Baldwin County), Tensaw — Fort Mims— 500 yards →
Here in Creek Indian War 1813-14 took place most brutal massacre in American history. Indians took fort with heavy loss, then killed all but about 36 of some 550 in the fort. Creeks had been armed by British at Pensacola in this phase . . . Map (db m86293) HM
39Alabama (Baldwin County), Tensaw — Fort Mims Massacre
In honor of the men, women and children massacred by Creek Indians in brave defence of Fort Mims Aug. 30, 1813. Map (db m86716) HM
40Alabama (Barbour County), Midway — Fort Browder / 15th Alabama Infantry
Fort Browder Approximately one mile south-southwest of here stood Fort Browder, a small wooden fortification built in 1836 for protection in the last war with the Creek Indians and named for Isham Browder, a prominent local planter. In . . . Map (db m164549) HM
41Alabama (Butler County), Forest Home — The Butler Massacre / Fort Bibb
(obverse) The Butler Massacre On March 20, 1818, Capt. William Butler, Capt. James Saffold, William Gardener, Daniel Shaw and John Hinson left Fort Bibb to meet Col. Sam Dale. They were attacked near Pine Barren Creek by Savannah . . . Map (db m83259) HM
42Alabama (Butler County), Greenville — Ogly-Stroud Massacre / Gary's Stockade
Ogly-Stroud Massacre William Ogly built his cabin near this site at Poplar Springs along the Federal Road, and was killed here with most of his family on March 13, 1818. His friend Eli Stroud's wife was fatally wounded and their infant . . . Map (db m120933) HM
43Alabama (Butler County), Greenville — The Federal Road and The Palings / Fort Dale 1818
The Federal Road and the Palings The Federal Road was built in 1806 as a shorter route from Washington to New Orleans and the new Louisiana Territory. The road entered Alabama at Fort Mitchell, Georgia and passed through Butler County near this . . . Map (db m130050) HM
44Alabama (Cherokee County), Gaylesville — Barry Springs Indian Stockade
One hundred feet east was one site where "The Trail of Tears" began. On May 23, 1838 the Indians of this general area, who had been held in a chestnut log stockade after being gathered by the U.S. Army, began their long trek to Oklahoma. The . . . Map (db m114398) HM
45Alabama (Clarke County), Rockville — Gravesite of Major Jeremiah Austill
Near this site, is the gravesite of Maj. Jeremiah Austill, folk hero & prominent figure in the early settlement of Clarke County. Born in 1794 in S. C., he lived, along with his parents, Capt. Evan and Sara Austill, among the Cherokee in Ga. Before . . . Map (db m101588) HM
46Alabama (Clarke County), Suggsville — Fort Madison-Creek War 1812-13
This marks the site of pioneer stockade commanded by Captains Sam Dale and Evan Austill. Choctaw Chieftain Pushmattaha often here. Expedition terminating in noted Canoe Fight on Alabama River immediately east of this site, was . . . Map (db m101566) HM
47Alabama (Clarke County), Whatley — Fort Sinquefield
Fort Sinquefield Kimbell - James Massacre Creek War 1812-13 Erected by Clarke County School Children 1931 Lest we forget Hayden and his dogs.Map (db m115627) HM
48Alabama (Clarke County), Winn — Fort Landrum Site
Built around the home of John Landrum Used during the Creek War of 1813 First Clarke County Court met here in 1813 Succeeding courts were held here until 1819 Map (db m101584) HM
49Alabama (Conecuh County), Pine Orchard — Old Federal RoadFort Warren
Site of Fort Warren, built in 1816 by Colonel Richard Warren, who owned considerable land in this vicinity. This facility was used as a refuge for settlers who feared for their lives in the early days of the aftermath of the Creek Indian Wars of . . . Map (db m47689) HM
50Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Interior Redoubt No. IIIWilson's Cavalry Charge — Battle of Selma —
By 6pm General James H. Wilson had moved the 4th U.S. Cavalry, down Summerfield Road through the outer works and had ordered Captain Robinson of the Chicago Board of Trade Battery to do the same. After the main assault most of the regiments of . . . Map (db m81930) HM
51Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Redoubt No. 151st Mississippi Cavalry — Battle of Selma —
Front Redoubt No. 15 located just to the west of Summerfield Road was defended by Colonel Pinson's 1st Mississippi Cavalry Regiment of Anderson's Brigade. Their 400 men held positions on the west side of the road and the rest of . . . Map (db m81925) HM
52Alabama (Dallas County), Selma — Union Troops ChargeThe Main Assault of the Outer Works — Battle of Selma —
The Lightening Brigade of the 2nd Division would spearhead the attack between Redoubts No. 13 - No. 16. Artillery covered all the approaches. At 5 p.m. General Long ordered the Second Division forward. "As Long's Second Division charged . . . Map (db m83682) HM
53Alabama (DeKalb County), Fort Payne — Fort Payne Cabin Historic Site
In 1837 Federal Troops arrived in this area to select a fort location for the collection, holding and removal of the Cherokee. Part of a much larger compound, this site contained a cabin seized by the troops for use as part of the fort. Today a . . . Map (db m100286) HM
54Alabama (DeKalb County), Fort Payne — Fort Payne’s Fort
The fort, consisting of a log house and large stockade, was built in 1838 by order of General Winfield Scott, commander of military forces responsible for the removal of Cherokee Indians. Soldiers occupying the fort were commanded by Captain . . . Map (db m28030) HM
55Alabama (Elmore County), Wetumpka — Fort Jackson
At this site stood Fort Toulouse, later Fort Jackson, named in honor of Gen. Andrew Jackson who on March 27, 1814, defeated the Creek Indians in a decisive battle at Horseshoe Bend. Erected by Peter Forney Chapter D.A.R. . . . Map (db m69705) HM
56Alabama (Elmore County), Wetumpka — Here Stood Fort Toulouse
Here stood Fort Toulouse A defense against the Indians Built by Bienville 1714 The Alabama Society of Colonial Dames preserves the memory of faithful service 1912Map (db m69567) HM
57Alabama (Escambia County), East Brewton — Site of Fort Crawford
 Fort Crawford was established in 1816 by elements of the 7th U.S. Infantry under orders from Major General Andrew Jackson. Purpose was to monitor Spanish activities in West Florida and curtail hostile Creek Indian activities.  Named after . . . Map (db m84373) HM
58Alabama (Henry County), Shorterville — Franklin - First Beachhead into East Alabama
The frontier village of Franklin was established here by Colonel Robert Irwin in 1814 on the site of the Indian town of Cheeska Talofa. It was the first colonial village in east Alabama. Fort Gaines, Georgia, was constructed in 1816 to protect the . . . Map (db m71844) HM
59Alabama (Jackson County), Stevenson — Wet, Wild, and Wonderful
Alabama’s Winter Waterfowl The Tennessee River Valley is the winter home for thousands of waterfowl. These birds migrate from across the northern US and Canada down through the center of the continent to the Tennessee River. Careful . . . Map (db m106298) HM
60Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — 115th Signal BattalionOrganized 1940
At this site where once stood Fort Willingham (Armory) the 115th Signal Battalion was organized December 1, 1940. Originally the 2nd Battalion, 151st Engineers, it was organized a number of times from 1940 to 1959 as its mission was changed to meet . . . Map (db m28562) HM
61Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Fort WillinghamNational Guard Armory
(side 1) The United States flag that flies at the base of this hill stands as a sentry over the site that was the home of Fort Willingham Armory from 1937-1979. The Armory was named after Dr. Henry J. Willingham, president of Florence State . . . Map (db m83987) HM
62Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Old Confederate Fort1862-1865
This high elevation was used by both armies during the Civil War. Large earthworks were constructed in February 1862 by Confederate Brigadier General Daniel Ruggles. At the time, more than 500 sick and wounded soldiers were being treated in . . . Map (db m156920) HM
63Alabama (Lee County), Cusseta — Fort CussetaChambers County
Following the signing of the Creek Treaty in 1832, the early white settlers constructed a 16 by 30 foot hand hewn log fort for protection against a possible Indian uprising from Cussetaw Indian Village on Osanippa Creek just north of here. Walls of . . . Map (db m71643) HM
64Alabama (Limestone County), Athens — Fort Hampton
Approx. ¼ mile North is the site of Ft. Hampton, built in 1810 and named in honor of Brig. General Wade Hampton of Revolutionary War fame. Two Companies of soldiers were stationed here in log buildings. The purpose of the fort, and its garrison . . . Map (db m154231) HM
65Alabama (Limestone County), Athens — Fort Henderson / Trinity School - 1865-1970
Fort Henderson Built on this site in 1863 by federal forces occupying Athens. It was a five-sided earthen fort with some frame buildings and underground bomb-proofs. Abatis lined the fifteen-foot deep perimeter ditch, a small portion of which . . . Map (db m41787) HM
66Alabama (Limestone County), Athens — Trinity School Cistern
This cistern is the last remnant of Trinity School located here 1865-1907. The cistern was used to store rainwater collected from the roof. No physical evidence remains of the Ross Hotel, the Chapman Quarters, and other buildings on this block, . . . Map (db m72219) HM
67Alabama (Limestone County), Elkmont — Battle of Sulphur Creek Trestle
On Sept. 25, 1864 Gen. N.B. Forrest's Confederate cavalry, with Morton's battery of 4 guns, attacked and captured the Union fort near here. The fort consisted of a square redoubt, rifle pits, two blockhouses, and some frame buildings. It protected a . . . Map (db m60870) HM
68Alabama (Limestone County), Elkmont — Sims Settlement
Side A (North side) In the fall of 1806 a group of settlers led by William and James Sims, traveled from east Tennessee on flatboats down the Tennessee River and up the Elk River to this area. They landed near Buck Island and spread out . . . Map (db m85454) HM
69Alabama (Mobile County), Creola — Site of Old Mobile
(English) Site of Old Mobile Fort Louis de la Louisiane Founded 1702 by Pierre Le Moyne d’Iberville Under orders of Louis XIV First Capital of French Louisiana 1702-1711 (French) Site de Vieux Mobile Fort . . . Map (db m70588) HM
70Alabama (Mobile County), Dauphin Island — Stop E — "Save Your Garrison."Bombardment of Fort Powell: — Stop E —
The Confederates built Fort Powell on Tower Island, an oyster shell bank fifty feet north of Grant's Pass. The Pass provided an easy route from Mobile Bay to New Orleans through Mississippi Sound. C.S. Lieutenant Colonel James M. Williams, only . . . Map (db m87239) HM
71Alabama (Mobile County), Dauphin Island — Stop D — "To Be Blown To Kingdom Come"Siege of Fort Gaines — Stop D —
Once Farragut was in the Bay, capture of Fort Gaines and Powell would prevent his isolation there. So at 4:00 pm, August 3, 1864, 1,500 soldiers commanded by U.S. General Edward Canby (but under the operational direction of General Gordon . . . Map (db m87219) HM
72Alabama (Mobile County), Dauphin Island — Stop D — “Damn the Torpedoes!”The Battle of Mobile Bay: — Stop D —
At 7:25 a.m., August 5, 1864, Admiral Farragut’s lead monitor Tecumseh steered into the torpedo field at the mouth of Mobile Bay. The admiral had ordered Commander Tunis Craven, the Tecumseh’s captain, to engage the ram . . . Map (db m87234) HM
73Alabama (Mobile County), Dauphin Island — Anchor From U.S.S. Hartford
This anchor came from the U.S.S. Hartford, Admiral Farragut's flagship during the Civil War "Battle of Mobile Bay" in August of 1864. It was there that he uttered the now famous words, "Damn the Torpedoes—Full Speed Ahead!"Map (db m87244) HM
74Alabama (Mobile County), Dauphin Island — Stop 1 — Storm Clouds GatherThe Overland Campaign — Stop 1: Fort Gaines —
To Wait and Watch In late August 1864 the Federals controlled Mobile Bay but could not attack Mobile. Admiral Farragut could not reach the City even with his light draft vessels, because the channels in the upper Bay had been obstructed. . . . Map (db m87243) HM
75Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — 10" Rifled Sea Coast Columbiad
Manufactured at Tredegar Iron Works Richmond, Virginia CSA This cannon was used by Alabama Confederate Forces in the defense of Mobile during the War for Southern Independence from 1861-1865. It was mounted at Ft. Powell, guarding . . . Map (db m86727) HM
76Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — Battle of Fort Blakely Monument
Ill. 76th Vol. Inf. In Memory of our Heroes Who Fell at Fort Blakely, Ala. April 9, 1865 —— 2nd Brig. 2nd Div. 13th Army Corps. William T. Duke • Micajah S. Moore • William Crimes • George H. Hopkins • George . . . Map (db m86870) WM
77Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — How Big was the Original Fort Condé?
Since colonial rulers were unable to attract large numbers of settlers to Mobile, the Port City’s population remained small and never grew above 500. Because the majority of Mobile’s population was military personnel, the city was built around the . . . Map (db m87207) HM
78Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — Mobile's First Jail
Here within Fort Charlotte was Mobile's first jail.Map (db m86436) HM
79Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — Second Fort Conde Ruin
This ruin is a vestige of the second Fort Conde. Built by the French in 1723 and later occupied by the British, Spanish, and the Americans, these foundations are the only architectural remains of Colonial Mobile.Map (db m117253) HM
80Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — The Revolutionary War at MobileSiege of Fort Charlotte (Condé) 1780
Spain, America's ally, declared war on Great Britain in June 1779. Bernardo de Galvez, governor of Spanish Louisiana at New Orleans, led the attack against the British along the lower Mississippi River and Gulf Coast. In February 1780, Galvez laid . . . Map (db m86355) HM
81Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — The Site of Historic Fort Condé
Patterned after forts designed by French military engineer Sebastian Le Pestre de Vauban, Fort Condé protected Mobile and its citizens for nearly 100 years from 1723-1820. Built by the French as a defense against British and Spanish attack, the . . . Map (db m160801) HM
82Alabama (Mobile County), Mt. Vernon — Fort Stoddert– 1799 →
Site three miles east. Border fort and port of entry into the United States while the 31st parallel was the southern border. Aaron Burr was held prisoner here after capture near McIntosh in 1807.Map (db m70592) HM
83Alabama (Mobile County), Mt. Vernon — 6 — Fort Stoddert — Mount Vernon History Trail —
Early in 1799 a joint U.S.-Spanish survey commission had determined the international boundary to be a few miles south of this spot, at 31° N Longitude. (A marker known as the Ellicott Stone still stands on the old boundary line, just east of US . . . Map (db m149312) HM
84Alabama (Mobile County), Mt. Vernon — 2 — Mount Vernon Arsenal — Mount Vernon History Trail —
The cannon in front of you, buried muzzle-down during an 1873 land survey to mark a corner of the Mount Vernon Military Reservation, is just one of many reminders that Mount Vernon hosted important U.S. Army posts throughout the 19th century. . . . Map (db m149304) HM
85Alabama (Mobile County), Mt. Vernon — Mt. Vernon Federal Highway
In 1811, the Mount Vernon Cantonment, located on a hill about three miles west of the Mobile River, was laid out by Col. Thomas H. Cushing. The cantonment was on the site of a spring called Mount Vernon Springs. In 1814, the garrison at Mt. Vernon . . . Map (db m85911) HM
86Alabama (Monroe County), Perdue Hill — Fort ClaiborneCreek Indian War 1813-1814
Built by Gen. Ferdinand L. Claiborne as a base for his invasion of the Alabama country with U.S. Regulars, Lower Tombigbee Militia, and friendly Choctaws. Claiborne’s campaign culminated in the American victory over the Creeks at the Holy Ground.Map (db m47641) HM
87Alabama (Monroe County), Perdue Hill — Piache
Piache, an Indian town visited by DeSoto in 1540 was near here. DeLuna made a settlement here, Nanipacna in 1560. Fort Claiborne was erected on the south bluff, in 1813. LaFayette was entertained here, 1825. . . . Map (db m47639) HM
88Alabama (Morgan County), Decatur — 2 — “A Hard Nut To Crack” - Federal Defenses at Decatur“A Hard Nut To Crack” — The Battle For Decatur —
Decatur played a key role in the Federal defenses of the vital rail lines in North Alabama. These defenses were configured in a three-tiered system. First, a number of lightly armored gunboats, constructed on the Tennessee River and nicknamed . . . Map (db m86476) HM
89Alabama (Morgan County), Decatur — 4 — “An Affair Most Important to Us” - The Federal Right, October 27-28, 1864“A Hard Nut To Crack” — The Battle For Decatur —
As Hood’s Army of Tennessee encircled Decatur, sharpshooters advanced upon the Union defenses. Colonel Doolittle’s men responded with heavy artillery and musket fire. During the early afternoon of October 27, the Confederates approached the Federal . . . Map (db m28241) HM
90Alabama (Russell County), Fort Mitchell — Fort Mitchell<----- 5 miles -----
Built during Creek War 1813 by Georgia Militia on main Indian trade route to Tombigbee River U.S. Troops stationed here until 1837 1836 Lower Creeks corralled here for forced removal to the WestMap (db m26069) HM
91Alabama (Russell County), Fort Mitchell — Fort Mitchell
Fort Mitchell Fort Mitchell is located on the Federal Road on the West bank overlooking the Chattahoochee River. General John Floyd received orders from Governor David B. Mitchell to pick up supplies, cross the Chattahoochee River and . . . Map (db m120003) HM
92Alabama (Russell County), Fort Mitchell — Fort Mitchell Military Cemetery
This military graveyard was established soon after Fort Mitchell was built by General John Floyd of the Georgia Militia. Located just south of the stockade, the cemetery was used between 1813 and 1840 during the fort's occupation by Georgia and . . . Map (db m26122) HM
93Alabama (Russell County), Fort Mitchell — The Creek Trail of Tears
Approximately one mile due east of this marker, back down the Old Federal Road, called by frontiersmen and Indians the Three Notched Trail or the Three Chopped Way, stood Fort Mitchell, an early 19th century American fort that in 1836 was one of the . . . Map (db m26100) HM
94Alabama (Russell County), Holy Trinity — Spanish Fort, 1689-1691
East of here, on the Chattahoochee River, was the "fort among the Apalachicolas," most northern of the Spanish settlements in eastern North America. A palisaded "strong house" built by Captain Enrique Primo de Rivera to check activities of English . . . Map (db m101252) HM
95Alabama (Russell County), Phenix City — Fort Jabe BrassellAlabama Army National Guard — Russell County —
Built in 1950, Fort Jabe Brassell has served as a hub for military training and arms storage for the local community by the Alabama Army National Guard and the Armory Commission of Alabama. Between July 1954 and January 1955, the Alabama Army . . . Map (db m165538) HM
96Alabama (Russell County), Seale — Creek Settlements in Russell County — Creek Heritage Trail —
Russell County occupies land that once sat at the heart of the Creek Nation. Within the county's boundaries were several important Creek towns, many of which would figure prominently in the Creek and Seminole Wars era and the saga of Removal. . . . Map (db m111596) HM
97Alabama (St. Clair County), Ohatchee — Fort Strother
Creek Indian War Headquarters of Gen. Andrew Jackson 1813 - 1814Map (db m28144) HM
98Alabama (Sumter County), Livingston — Sumter County
1736:   First settlement by French at Ft. Tombecbee. 1830:   U.S. got Choctaw Indian lands by Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek. 1832:   County created by Act of State Legislature -- named for Gen. Thomas Sumter, "The Gamecock," South . . . Map (db m92663) HM
99Alabama (Talladega County), Sylacauga — Fort Williams12 miles west
Built by Andrew Jackson with U.S. Regulars, Tennessee Volunteers and friendly Cherokees and Creeks. Used as advance base during final phases of Creek Indian War, 1813-1814. Military cemetery nearby.Map (db m57761) HM
100Alabama (Tallapoosa County), Jacksons' Gap — Fort Okfuskee←— 6 mi. west —«
Built in 1735 by British from Carolina in futile attempt to gain trade of the Creek Indians from the French, located at Fort Toulouse, 40 mi. S. Okfuskee was the largest town in Creek Confederacy.Map (db m22232) HM

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May. 14, 2021