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Defenses of Washington Historical Markers

Collection of markers detailing the wartime fortifications around Washington, D.C.
 
Fort Bayard Marker image, Touch for more information
By Tom Fuchs, February 20, 2006
Fort Bayard Marker
GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1District of Columbia (Washington), American University Park — Fort Bayard
Civil War Defenses of Washington 1861-1865. No visible evidence remains of Fort Bayard, which stood at the top of this hill. Named for Brig. Gen. George Bayard, mortally wounded at the Battle of Fredericksburg on December 13, 1862. — Map (db m124) HM
2District of Columbia (Washington), Bellevue — Fort Greble — Civil War Defenses of Washington — 1861-1865 —
Earthworks of Fort Greble are visible beyond this exhibit. Fort Greble was named in honor of Lt. John T. Greble, slain at the Battle of Big Bethel, June 10, 1861, the first U.S. Military Academy graduate killed in the Civil War. — Map (db m40866) HM
3District of Columbia (Washington), Benning Ridge — Fort Chaplin — Civil War Defenses of Washington — 1861-1865 —
Earthworks of Fort Chaplin are visible through the wooded areas at the top of the hill. Fort Chaplin was named in honor of Col. Daniel Chaplin, who was mortally wounded on August 17, 1864, at Deep Bottom, Virginia. — Map (db m10628) HM
4District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — 16 — “Get Down You Fool” — Battleground to Community — Brightwood Heritage Trail —
Hearing those words, President Abraham Lincoln ducked down from the Fort Stevens parapet during the Civil War battle that stopped the Confederates from taking Washington. On July 9, 1864, some 15,000 Rebels led by General Jubal A. Early . . . — Map (db m72829) HM
5District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — 17 — Aunt Betty's Story — Battleground to Community — Brightwood Heritage Trail —
Elizabeth Proctor Thomas (1821-1917), a free Black woman whose image appears on each Brightwood Heritage Trail sign, once owned 11 acres in this area. Known, respectfully in her old age as "Aunt Betty," Thomas and her husband James farmed and . . . — Map (db m72830) HM
6District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — Fort Stevens
Civil War Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 The partial reconstruction of Fort Stevens that you see today was done by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1937. No visible evidence of the original fort remains. Battle of Fort Stevens July . . . — Map (db m3028) HM
7District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — Fort Stevens — Rock Creek Park
We haven’t taken Washington, but we scared Abe Lincoln like hell! ” General Jubal Anderson Early Built between 1861-1863 this structure was originally called Fort Massachusetts and guarded the northern defenses of the . . . — Map (db m49456) HM
8District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — Lincoln Under Fire at Fort Stevens
Lincoln Under Fire at Fort Stevens July 12, 1864 — Map (db m901) HM
9District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — Scale Model of Fort Stevens
Dedicated September 1936 in memory of The Grand Army of the Republic by the Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War 1861-1865 — Map (db m49526) HM
10District of Columbia (Washington), Brookland — Fort Bunker Hill — Civil War Defenses of Washington — 1861-1865 —
Captions: Fort Bunker Hill from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers drawing. Built by the 11th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment who named the fort after the Revolutionary War battle in their home state. Other Civil War fort . . . — Map (db m111794) HM
11District of Columbia (Washington), Brookland — Fort Bunker Hill
One of the Civil War Defenses of Washington erected in the fall of 1861, Fort Bunker Hill occupied an important position between Fort Totten and Fort Lincoln in the defense of the National Capital. Thirteen guns and mortars were mounted in the fort. — Map (db m111795) HM
12District of Columbia (Washington), Congress Heights — Fort Carroll — Civil War Defenses of Washington — 1861-1865 —
Earthworks of Fort Carroll are visible 100 yards to the right at the top of the hill. Fort Carroll was named in honor of Maj. Gen. Samuel Sprigg Carroll, a West Point graduate from the District of Columbia. — Map (db m10614) HM
13District of Columbia (Washington), Fort Davis — Fort Davis — Civil War Defenses of Washington
One of several earthworks commenced late in 1861 to guard the nation’s capital from the ridge east of the Anacostia River. The fort was named in honour of Colonel Benjamin F. Davis of the 8th New York Cavalry, killed at Beverly Ford, Virginia, June . . . — Map (db m40690) HM
14District of Columbia (Washington), Fort Dupont — Fort DuPont — Civil War Defenses of Washington — 1861 - 1865 —
Panel 1: Civil War Defenses of Washington Fort DuPont This small work was one of the defenses begun in the fall of 1861 on the ridge east of the Anacostia River. It was named after Admiral Samuel DuPont, a commander of the South Atlantic . . . — Map (db m46425) HM
15District of Columbia (Washington), Fort Totten — Fort Totten — Civil War Defenses of Washington — 1861-1865 —
Earthworks of Fort Totten are visible within the wooded area 50 yards at the top of this hill. Cannon mounted at Fort Totten helped repulse a Confederate attack on Fort Stevens, July 11-12, 1864. — Map (db m2993) HM
16District of Columbia (Washington), Fort Totten — Fort Totten
One of the Civil War defenses of Washington construction of Fort Totten was begun in August 1861, named after Gen. Joseph G. Totten the fort contained 20 guns and mortars including eight 32-pounders. — Map (db m2999) HM
17District of Columbia (Washington), Kent — Battery Kemble Park — Defense of Washington
Built in the autumn of 1861 and enlarged in 1862, the battery was named for Gouveneur Kemble of Cold Spring, NY, a former superintendent of the West Point Foundry. The battery, which consisted of two 100-pound Parrott guns, was designed to sweep the . . . — Map (db m142203) HM
18District of Columbia (Washington), Mahaning Heights — 15 — "We're Not Forgotten" — A Self-Reliant People — Greater Deanwood Heritage Trail —
Formerly known as the Bladensburg Piscataway Road, Minnesota Avenue has long served as an eastern gateway into Washington. Since the original wooden Benning Road Bridge across the Anacostia River was erected nearby in 1800, countless people have . . . — Map (db m136184) HM
19District of Columbia (Washington), Mahaning Heights — Fort Mahan — Civil War Defenses of Washington
Fort Mahan Civil War Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Earthworks of Fort Mahan are visible; follow path at the top of the hill. [Illustration:] Fort Mahan from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers drawing. - Fort . . . — Map (db m46083) HM
20District of Columbia (Washington), Manor Park — Company K, 150th Ohio National Guard Infantry
Memorial to Co. K. 150th O.N.G.I. Which took part In the defense of Fort Stevens, D. C. July 12, 1864 — Map (db m76118) WM
21District of Columbia (Washington), Manor Park — Fort Slocum — Civil War Defenses of Washington — 1861-1865 —
No visible evidence remains of Fort Slocum, which stood here and across Kansas Avenue to your left. Cannon mounted at Fort Totten helped repulse a Confederate attack on Fort Stevens, July 11-12, 1864. — Map (db m110283) HM
22District of Columbia (Washington), Manor Park — Roll Call — Rock Creek Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
As the gallant soldiers that are interred at the cemetery marched onto the battlefield on July 11-12, 1864 during the Battle of Fort Stevens, their regimental flags accompanied then into the fight. Battleground National Cemetery honors these . . . — Map (db m64225) HM
23District of Columbia (Washington), Manor Park — The 122nd New York Volunteer Infantry
To the gallant sons of Onondaga County, N.Y. who fought on this field July 12, 1864 in defence of Washington and in the presence of Abraham Lincoln 122 N.Y.V — Map (db m76093) WM
24District of Columbia (Washington), Manor Park — The 25th New York Cavalry
. . . — Map (db m76117) WM
25District of Columbia (Washington), Rock Creek Park — Fort De Russy — Civil War Defenses of Washington — 1861-1865 —
Earthworks of Fort De Russy are visible; follow path to your right for 200 years. [drawing of fort] Fort De Russy from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers drawing. Cannon mounted at Fort De Russy helped repulse a Confederate attack on . . . — Map (db m20822) HM
26District of Columbia (Washington), Rock Creek Park — Fort DeRussy
One of the Civil War Defenses of Washington. Constructed on the site in 1861 Fort DeRussy commanded the deep valley of Rock Creek. Its armament consisted of 11 guns and mortars including a 100-pounder Parrott Rifle. — Map (db m20823) HM
27District of Columbia (Washington), Rock Creek Park — Fort DeRussy — Rock Creek Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
Built in 1861 to protect the Rock Creek Valley during the Civil War, Fort DeRussy's cannon fired a total of 109 projectiles into the northern countryside as 12,000-15,000 Confederate soldiers attacked the city under the command of Confederate . . . — Map (db m116084) HM
28District of Columbia (Washington), Takoma — 98th Pennsylvania Infantry
In Memory of Our Comrades Killed and Wounded in Battle on This Field July 11th & 12th 1864 98th Reg't. P.V. 1st Brig., 2nd Div., 6th Corps — Map (db m76116) WM
29District of Columbia (Washington), Takoma — Battleground National Cemetery — Rock Creek Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
During the late evening of July 12, 1864, 40 Union soldiers that perished while defending Washington DC from a two day Confederate attack (known as the Battle of Fort Stevens) were laid to rest here in what was once an apple orchard. President . . . — Map (db m63644) HM
30District of Columbia (Washington), Takoma — 13 — Battleground National Cemetery — Battleground to Community — Brightwood Heritage Trail —
After the rebels were turned back as the Battle of Fort Stevens ended in 1864, scores of Union Soldiers lay cold and silent. Forty-one of them are buried here in this tiny plot dedicated to their sacrifice. President Abraham Lincoln, who . . . — Map (db m72825) HM
31District of Columbia (Washington), Tenleytown — Fort Reno — Tenleytown, D.C. — Country Village to City Neighborhood —
At an elevation of 410 feet, Fort Reno is located at the highest point in DC. The fort, originally named Fort Pennsylvania, was well situated to provide defense of the Nation's Capital during the Civil War as one of the Circle of Forts (pictured . . . — Map (db m20628) HM
32District of Columbia (Washington), Tenleytown — Fort Reno — Civil War Defenses of Washington — 1861-1865 —
No visible evidence remains of Fort Reno, which stood at the top of this hill, the highest elevation in Washington, D.C. [drawing of Fort Reno] Fort Reno from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers drawing. Cannon mounted at Fort Reno helped repulse . . . — Map (db m20629) HM
33District of Columbia (Washington), Tenleytown — 5 — Fort Reno — Top of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail —
To your right is "Point Reno," the highest point in Washington — 409 feet above sea level, to be exact. This unsurpassed vantage brought the Civil War (1861-1865) to Tenleytown. After the Union defeat at Bull Run in July 1861, . . . — Map (db m130923) HM
34District of Columbia (Washington), Tenleytown — Fort Reno — Rock Creek Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
At 409 feet above sea level, this site is the highest point in Washington, D.C. It is no coincidence that in 1861, the Union army designed one the largest and most heavily armed Civil War fortifications at this location. Originally named . . . — Map (db m133962) HM
35District of Columbia (Washington), Tenleytown — Fort Reno — Rock Creek Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
At 409 feet above sea level, this site is the highest point in Washington, D.C. It is no coincidence that in 1861, the Union army designed one the largest and most heavily armed Civil War fortifications at this location. Originally named . . . — Map (db m136006) HM
36District of Columbia (Washington), Tenleytown — 6 — Reno City — Top of the Town — Tenleytown Heritage Trail —
Before the Civil War (1861-65), the land behind you was part of the 72-acre farm of Giles Dyer. As a Southerner, Dyer depended on enslaved people to work his fields. Because of its elevation, Dyers land was taken by the Union Army in 1861 . . . — Map (db m130924) HM
37District of Columbia (Washington), Tenleytown — Reservoir / Reno City — Tenleytown, DC — Country Village to City Neighborhood —
Fort Reno is located at the highest elevation in D.C. A city water reservoir was constructed in the 1890s to serve the city's growing population. The red brick water tower (pictured here) was built in 1903 to provide water pressure to the immediate . . . — Map (db m112184) HM
38District of Columbia (Washington), Tenleytown — Tennally's Town: My, How You've Grown — ©2017, Jarrett Ferrier — Funded by the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, Public Art Building Communities Grant Progra —
Top of the Town Greetings from Tenleytown altitude 409' [Pictured on the mural are events and locations significant to Tenleytown's history:] • Fort Reno Water Towers • The Tenleytown Streetcar • Fort Reno and the Civil . . . — Map (db m150280) HM
39District of Columbia (Washington), Tenleytown — The Civil War Defenses of Washington — Fort Reno
The site of this fort was selected in August, 1861. First called Fort Pennsylvania, the fort was located at an elevation of 430 feet, commanding three important roads which entered the city from the northwest in the vicinity of what is now Wisconsin . . . — Map (db m20630) HM
40District of Columbia (Washington), Woodland — Battery Ricketts — Civil War Defenses of Washington — 1861-1865 —
Earthworks of Battery Ricketts are visible inside the wooded area in front of you. Battery Ricketts, built to defend an area in front of Fort Stanton, was named for Maj. Gen. James B. Ricketts. — Map (db m10622) HM
41Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Battery Bailey
During the Civil War, fortifications were constructed around the perimeter of Washington to defend the city from attack by the Confederate Army. Paramount to survival under siege was protection of the city's water supply. Forts Sumner and Mansfield . . . — Map (db m17647) HM
42Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Col. Guilford Dudley Bailey — The Fallen Union Officer for Whom the Battery Was Named —
Born June 4, 1834, in Martinsburg, New York, this 1856 West Point graduate returned to his alma mater as an instructor following a tour of duty in the west and midwest. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Bailey organized the First New York Light . . . — Map (db m17695) HM
43Maryland (Montgomery County), Bethesda — Fort Sumner
Forts Alexander, Ripley and Franklin, built to protect the Washington water system in 1861, were connected by earthworks in 1863 and renamed Ft. Sumner to honor Maj. Gen. Edwin V. Sumner, A hero of Antietam. The fort’s 28 cannon providea a . . . — Map (db m3448) HM
44Maryland (Prince George's County), Colmar Manor — Fort Lincoln
These earthworks are a portion of the original fortifications which made up Fort Lincoln. This fort was built during the summer of 1861 to serve as an outer defense of the city of Washington. It was named in honor of President Lincoln by General . . . — Map (db m46714) HM
45Maryland (Prince George's County), Colmar Manor — Historic Fort Lincoln Cemetery
Fort Lincoln Cemetery was chartered in 1912 by an act of the Maryland General Assembly and presently contains 178 acres. Here, at Fort Lincoln Cemetery, masterworks of marble, granite and bronze stand in solemn dignity and provides a tranquil . . . — Map (db m151234) HM
46Maryland (Prince George's County), Fort Washington — 15-inch Rodman Smoothbore
Among the largest cannon used in the Civil War Monumental in size, these two immense guns remain as sentinels ready to repel an attack on the Nation's capital. With their extended range and commanding location above the river, they were the key . . . — Map (db m7636) HM
47Maryland (Prince George's County), Fort Washington — Fort Foote — Protecting the Nation’s Capital
High on a bluff, a hundred feet above the Potomac River, twelve heavy guns commanded the approach to the city. Smaller cannon were placed to protect Fort Foote from landward attack. Numerous buildings were constructed to house and support the large . . . — Map (db m41414) HM
48Maryland (Prince George's County), Fort Washington — Fort Washington Park
Fort Washington Park is the site of the first permanent fort constructed between 1814-1824 to guard the Potomac River approach to our Nation's Capital. Today the park offers many recreational opportunities and programs. Explore the historic sites . . . — Map (db m4554) HM
49Maryland (Prince George's County), Fort Washington — King's Depression Carriage
Capt. Rufus King, Jr. devised a counterweight system and front-pintle mount that would allow the 49,000 pdr. Rodman Gun to depress during loading. Except for the brief periods of exposure to enemy fire during the aiming and firing of the gun, the . . . — Map (db m7625) HM
50Maryland (Prince George's County), Fort Washington — Northwest Bastion
Protecting the fort against land attack Armed with smaller field and siege guns, the landward bastions could deliver a sustained cannonade of 12- and 30-pounder shells. The long central traverse provided protection and contained magazines and . . . — Map (db m7632) HM
51Maryland (Prince George's County), Fort Washington — The Defenses of Washington
At the start of the Civil War, Washington was protected by only one fort, Fort Washington guarding the Potomac River approach. The capital city was uncomfortably close to Confederate forces operating in Northern Virginia. by 1864, a system of . . . — Map (db m7635) HM
52Virginia (Alexandria), Historical District — Battery Rodgers
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Battery Rodgers Here stood Battery Rodgers, built in 1863 to prevent enemy ships from passing up the Potomac River. The battery had a perimeter of 30 yards and mounted five 200 pounder Parrott . . . — Map (db m41413) HM
53Virginia (Alexandria), Seminary Hill — "The Fort" and "Seminary" Community — Civil War to Civil Rights — City of Alexandria, Virginia Est. 1749 —
African Americans established "The Fort," a community that continued here after the Civil War (1861-1864) for nearly a century into the Civil Rights Era of the 1960s. The place received its name from The Fort's location around the remnants of . . . — Map (db m149722) HM
54Virginia (Alexandria), Seminary Hill — African Americans and the Civil War — Fleeing, Fighting and Working for Freedom — City of Alexandria, Virginia Est. 1749 —
The Civil War (1861-1865) opened the door for opportunity and civil rights for African American Virginians, about 90 percent of whom were enslaved in 1860. The upheaval from battles and the federal presence in Alexandria and eastern Fairfax . . . — Map (db m149734) HM
55Virginia (Alexandria), Seminary Hill — Bombproof
Two bombproofs, each measuring 200 feet long by 12.5 feet wide, were located in the center of Fort Ward. During normal operations the bombproofs were used as meeting rooms, storage facilities, and sometimes as a prison. In the event of an attack, . . . — Map (db m7716) HM
56Virginia (Alexandria), Seminary Hill — Entrance Gate to Fort Ward — Officers' Hut
The Fort Ward entrance gate, completed in May 1865, provided the only access to the interior of the fort. The gate's decorative details include stands of cannonballs and the insignia (castle) of the Army Corps of Engineers which designed and . . . — Map (db m7680) HM
57Virginia (Alexandria), Seminary Hill — Fort Ward — 1861-1865
On May 24, 1861, when Virginia's secession from the Union became effective, Federal forces immediately occupied Northern Virginia to protect the City of Washington, D.C. After the Confederate victory at the Battle of First Bull Run (First Manassas) . . . — Map (db m7676) HM
58Virginia (Alexandria), Seminary Hill — Fort Ward — 1861-1865
This stairway leads up the west wall of Fort Ward between the Northwest Bastion (to the left) and the Southwest Bastion (to the right). Fort Ward had 14 cannon emplacements along this area of the wall that created overlapping fields of fire. . . . — Map (db m7709) HM
59Virginia (Alexandria), Seminary Hill — Fort Ward
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Ward Here stands Fort Ward, constructed in 1861 to protect the approaches to Alexandria by Little River Turnpike and Leesburg Turnpike. In 1864, the fort was enlarged to a perimeter of 818 . . . — Map (db m41117) HM
60Virginia (Alexandria), Seminary Hill — Fort Williams
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861 - 1865 100 yards to the west stood Fort Williams, built in 1863 to guard the approaches to Alexandria by Little River Turnpike and Telegraph Road. It had a perimeter of 250 yards and emplacements . . . — Map (db m80467) HM
61Virginia (Alexandria), Seminary Hill — Fort Worth
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861 - 1865 Here stood Fort Worth, built in 1861. It had a commanding view of the Cameron Valley and guarded the approach to Alexandria by Little River Turnpike. The fort had a perimeter of 463 yards . . . — Map (db m80466) HM
62Virginia (Alexandria), Seminary Hill — Northwest Bastion
The plan of Fort Ward consisted of five bastions with positions for 36 guns. The Northwest Bastion illustrates how the entire stronghold appeared in 1864. This bastion is armed with six reproduction weapons based on Fort Ward's original table of . . . — Map (db m7713) HM
63Virginia (Alexandria), Seminary Hill — Outlying Gun Battery — City of Alexandria, Virginia
This outlying 6-gun battery was constructed to cover the ravine where Interstate 395 is located today. The remains of a covered-way rifle trench that extended from the Northwest Bastion is visible near the park road. This trench provided protection . . . — Map (db m149735) HM
64Virginia (Alexandria), Seminary Hill — Powder Magazine and Filling Room
Ammunition for the fort's guns was kept in underground storage facilities called magazines and filling rooms. Shells were armed and sometimes stored in the filling room, while the magazine was used to hold black powder and crated rounds. Implements . . . — Map (db m7711) HM
65Virginia (Alexandria), Seminary Hill — Profile of Fort
This exterior view of the restored Northwest Bastion illustrates the effectiveness of an earthwork fort. The fort walls were 18-22 feet high, 12-14 feet thick, and slanted at 45 degrees. To gain access to the fort an attacker would have to cross . . . — Map (db m7714) HM
66Virginia (Alexandria), Seminary Hill — Rifle Trench
This rifle trench extended from the North Bastion toward Battery Garesche located beyond Leesburg Turnpike (Route 7). Another rifle trench extended from the tip of the South Bastion near the Fort Gate. The rifle trenches prevented enemy troops from . . . — Map (db m7715) HM
67Virginia (Alexandria), Seminary Hill — Southwest Bastion — City of Alexandria, Virginia
The Southwest Bastion was the most heavily fortified area of the fort with emplacements for seven guns, as well as a magazine and a filling room. The largest gun in Fort Ward, a 100-pounder Parrott Rifle, was located in the Southwest Bastion. . . . — Map (db m7684) HM
68Virginia (Alexandria), Southwest Quadrant — Alexandria National Cemetery
Securing the Capital On May 24, 1861, Gen. Winfield Scott ordered eleven regiments of Union troops from Washington, D.C., across the Potomac River, where they captured Arlington and Alexandria. After their defeat in July at Manassas, . . . — Map (db m92113) HM
69Virginia (Alexandria), Taylor Run — Fort Ellsworth
Fort Ellsworth, one of 68 earthen forts built to protect Washington during the Civil War, was constructed in 1861. When completed, the fort had a perimeter of 618 yards and was an irregular Vauban-type star design of French origin. The fort was . . . — Map (db m45046) HM
70Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — A Bastion-Style Fort Is a Mighty Fortress
Fort Ethan Allen's star-shaped design enabled soldiers to defend all sides of the fort. Constructed primarily from earth and wood, Fort Ethan Allen was a bastion-style fort. Bastions are angular structures that jut out from the enclosing . . . — Map (db m129227) HM WM
71Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — A Defensive Artillery Fort
Fort Ethan Allen had emplacements for 36 guns. The forts that formed the Defenses of Washington were placed at half-mile intervals, supplemented with artillery batteries and rifle pits, making a nearly continuous connection between . . . — Map (db m129236) HM
72Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — A Historic Junction
This point has long been a vital gateway for commerce and travelers. In the early 1800s, the first Long Bridge connected Alexandria traders and Virginia farmers with Washington and Georgetown. Now, cars, trains, and the Metro carry people and goods . . . — Map (db m134979) HM
73Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Arlington Transformed by War
". . . a detail of men with axes was marched . . . to the place afterwards known as 'Fort Runyon' and proceeded to level the ground of a fine peach orchard of three hundred trees." Emmons Clark, History of the Seventh . . . — Map (db m134984) HM
74Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 20 — Battery Gareschι — Historical Site — Defenses of Washington 1861 - 1865 —
Here stood Battery Gareschι, constructed late in 1861 to control the higher ground dominating Fort Reynolds, 200 yards to the southeast. It had a perimeter of 166 yards and emplacements for 8 guns. — Map (db m5164) HM
75Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Communications along the Defensive Line
Fort Ethan Allen was a repeating station, transmitting messages back and forth to other nearby stations. A series of signal stations linked the forts of the Defenses of Washington. The soldiers who relayed secret messages from station to . . . — Map (db m129238) HM
76Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Fort Albany
Immediately to the northwest stood Fort Albany, a bastioned earthwork built in May 1861 to command the approach to the Long Bridge by way of the Columbia Turnpike. It had a perimeter of 429 yards and emplacements for 12 guns. Even after Forts . . . — Map (db m5258) HM
77Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 18 — Fort Barnard — Historical Site — Defenses of Washington 1861 - 1865 —
Here stood Fort Barnard, a redoubt constructed late in 1861 to command the approaches to Alexandria by way of Four Mile Run and Glebe Road. It was named for General J. G. Barnard, Chief Engineer of the Defenses of Washington. It had a perimeter of . . . — Map (db m5158) HM
78Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 1 — Fort Bennett
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Bennett Here stood Fort Bennett, a small outwork of Fort Corcoran, constructed in May 1861. With a perimeter of 146 yards and emplacements for 5 guns, it was designed to bring under fire the . . . — Map (db m5104) HM
79Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 17 — Fort Berry — Historical Site — Defenses of Washington 1861 - 1865 —
Immediately to the west stood Fort Berry, a redoubt constructed in 1863 at the north flank of the defenses of Alexandria, but also flanking the Columbia Turnpike and the Arlington Line constructed in 1861. It had a perimeter of 215 yards and . . . — Map (db m5154) HM
80Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Fort C.F. Smith — Defending the Capital
Fort C.F. Smith was constructed in early 1863 as part of the expansion and strengthening of the capital’s defenses that continued throughout the Civil War. With Forts Strong, Morton and Woodbury, Fort C.F. Smith formed the outer perimeter of the . . . — Map (db m5099) HM
81Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Fort C.F. Smith — Mr. Lincoln’s Forts — Defenses of Washington, 1861-1865 —
Fort C.F. Smith was constructed in 1863 on farmland appropriated from William Jewell. The fort was named in honor of Gen. Charles Ferguson Smith, who was instrumental in the Union victory at Fort Donelson, Tennessee in 1862. The fortification was . . . — Map (db m5101) HM
82Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Fort C.F. Smith — Protecting the Capital
The ramps in front of you, now covered with grass, led to wooden platforms on which the various cannons were placed. When built in 1863, Fort C.F. Smith had platforms for twenty-two artillery pieces and four siege mortars. However, only sixteen . . . — Map (db m5102) HM
83Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 8 — Fort C.F. Smith
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort C.F. Smith Just to the north are the remains of Fort C.F. Smith. A lunette built early in 1863 to command the high ground north of Spout Run and protect the flank of the Arlington Line. It . . . — Map (db m5103) HM
84Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 13 — Fort Cass — Historical Site — Defenses of Washington 1861 - 1865 —
During the Civil War, the Union built a series of forts to defend Washington, D.C. By 1865 there were 33 earthen fortifications in the Arlington Line. Fort Cass (1861) was part of this defensive strategy. Built on top of the rise east of this . . . — Map (db m5141) HM
85Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 2 — Fort Corcoran
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Corcoran During the Civil War, the Union built a series of forts to defend Washington, D.C. By 1865 there were 33 earthen fortifications in the Arlington Line. Fort Corcoran (1861) was part . . . — Map (db m5106) HM
86Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 15 — Fort Craig — Historical Site — Defenses of Washington 1861 - 1865 —
Here stood Fort Craig, a lunette in the Arlington Line constructed in August 1861. It had a perimeter of 324 yards and emplacements for 11 guns. — Map (db m5150) HM
87Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 7 — Fort Ethan Allen
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Ethan Allen This embankment was the south face of Fort Ethan Allen, a bastioned earthwork built in September 1861 to command all the approaches to Chain Bridge south of Pimmit Run. The fort . . . — Map (db m2317) HM
88Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Fort Ethan Allen — Mr. Lincoln’s Forts — Defenses of Washington - 1861-1865 —
Fort Ethan Allen was constructed during the Civil War to provide one of the last lines of defense against possible Confederate attacks aimed at Washington. The fort commanded approaches to Chain Bridge (over the Potomac River) from the south of . . . — Map (db m2318) HM
89Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 3 — Fort Haggerty
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Haggerty Here beside the Georgetown-Alexandria road stood Fort Haggerty, a small outwork of Fort Corcoran, constructed in May 1861. With a perimeter of 128 yards and emplacements for 4 guns, . . . — Map (db m5111) HM
90Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 19 — Fort Reynolds — Historical Site — Defenses of Washington 1861 - 1865 —
Here stood Fort Reynolds, a redoubt constructed in September, 1861, to command the approach to Alexandria by way of the valley of Four Mile Run. It had a perimeter of 360 yards and emplacements for 12 guns. — Map (db m5155) HM
91Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 16 — Fort Richardson — Historical Site — Defenses of Washington 1861 - 1865 —
Here is what is left of Fort Richardson, a detached redoubt constructed in September, 1861, to cover the left flank of the newly built Arlington defense line, It was named for General Israel B. Richardson, whose division was then deployed to defend . . . — Map (db m39726) HM
92Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 5 — Fort Runyon — Historical Site — Defenses of Washington 1861 - 1865 —
A half-mile to the southwest stood Fort Runyon, a large bastioned earthwork constructed in May 1861 to protect the Long Bridge over the Potomac. Its perimeter, 1484 yards, was about the same as that of the Pentagon. After the construction of the . . . — Map (db m5255) HM
93Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Fort Runyon after the Civil War
Following the end of the Civil War, Fort Runyon was dismantled, the garrison sent home, and the land returned to its owner, James Roach. Squatters — among them freed blacks — occupied the vacant fort, scavenging its timbers for . . . — Map (db m134989) HM
94Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Fort Runyon: Defending the Capital
Fort Runyon once stood on this site. Built by Union troops at the start of the Civil War, the fort guarded access to the Virginia end of the Long Bridge, which led directly across the Potomac River to the heart of Washington, D.C. The fort . . . — Map (db m134981) HM
95Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 6 — Fort Scott
Historical Site Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 Fort Scott Here stood a detached lunette constructed in May, 1861, to guard the south flank of the defenses of Washington and named for General Winfield Scott, then General-in-Chief of the Army. . . . — Map (db m5257) HM
96Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 9 — Fort Strong — Historical Site — Defenses of Washington 1861 - 1865 —
Nearby to the north stood Fort Strong, a lunette marking the north end of the Arlington Line constructed in August 1861. It had a perimeter of 318 yards and emplacements for 15 guns. — Map (db m5112) HM
97Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 14 — Fort Tillinghast — Historical Site — Defenses of Washington 1861 - 1865 —
Here stood Fort Tillinghast, a lunette in the Arlington Line constructed in August 1861. It had a perimeter of 298 yards and emplacements for 13 guns. A model of this fort, typical of all lunettes in the Arlington Line, can be seen at the Hume . . . — Map (db m5147) HM
98Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 12 — Fort Whipple — Historical Site — Defenses of Washington 1861 - 1865 —
On the high ground to the northeast stood Fort Whipple, a bastioned earthwork built early in 1863 to support the Arlington Line built in 1861. It had a perimeter of 640 yards and emplacements for 47 guns. After the War, Fort Whipple was maintained . . . — Map (db m5140) HM
99Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — 11 — Fort Woodbury — Historical Site — Defenses of Washington 1861 - 1865 —
During the Civil War, the Union built a series of forts to defend Washington, D.C. By 1865 there were 33 earthen fortifications in the Arlington Line. Fort Woodbury (1861) was part of this defensive strategy. Built east of this marker, this lunette . . . — Map (db m5138) HM
100Virginia (Arlington County), Arlington — Known Units Garrisoned at Fort Runyon
7th Regiment New York Militia Infantry ★ May 1861 ★ Construction 2d New Jersey Infantry (three months) ★ May 1861 3d New Jersey Infantry (three months) ★ May 1861 21st New York Infantry ★ May - August 1861 . . . — Map (db m134988) HM

124 entries matched your criteria. The first 100 are listed above. The final 24 ⊳
 
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Nov. 24, 2020