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Fayette County West Virginia Historical Markers

 
"Contentment" Marker image, Touch for more information
By Forest McDermott, May 26, 2012
"Contentment" Marker
West Virginia (Fayette County), Ansted — "Contentment"
Built, 1830, on the old James River and Kanawha Turnpike. Restored antebellum home of Colonel George W. Imboden, on General Lee's staff, C.S.A. Property and headquarters of the Fayette County Historical Society, organized in 1926. — Map (db m50392) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Ansted — "Halfway House"
Regular stop on the James River and Kanawha Turnpike. The original building, dating from before the Revolution, was rebuilt by William Tyree, 1810. During the winter of 1861-62, it was headquarters for Chicago Gray Dragoons. — Map (db m67013) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Ansted — ContentmentHome of George W. Imboden
After the Civil War, George W. Imboden lived here with his wife, Mary Tyree, the daughter of William Tyree of Tyree Tavern. When the war began, Imboden enlisted in the Staunton Artillery in Augusta County, Virginia, where he then resided. He . . . — Map (db m34371) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Ansted — Hawk’s Nest
Once called Marshall’s Pillar for Chief Justice John Marshall, who came here, 1812. U.S. engineers declare the New River Canyon, 585 feet deep, surpasses the famed Royal Gorge. Tunnel for river makes vast water power here. — Map (db m20675) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Ansted — FA 1 — Hawk's Nest Tunnel Disaster
Construction of nearby tunnel, diverting waters of New R. through Gauley Mt. for hydroelectric power, resulted in state’s worst industrial disaster. Silica rock dust caused 109 admitted deaths in mostly black, migrant underground work force of 3,000 . . . — Map (db m34417) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Ansted — Jackson's Mother
In Westlake Cemetery is the grave of the mother of General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson. The monument at the grave was placed by Captain Thomas Ranson, who had fought in Jackson's old brigade in the War between the States. — Map (db m34376) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Ansted — New Haven Veterans' MemorialVFW Post 7695
Proudly and humbly dedicated this Memorial to all who served our country; especially those who gave the ultimate sacrifice — Map (db m34499) WM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Ansted — Salt Sand
The sheer cliffs of Nuttall sandstones forming the walls of the New River Gorge are the "Salt Sands" of the driller. These sands produce oil and natural gas in West Virginia and commercial brines on the Kanawha and Ohio Rivers. Sponsored . . . — Map (db m34420) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Ansted — Tyree TavernConfederate and Union Headquarters
During his and Gen. Henry Alexander Wise’s unsuccessful Kanawha Valley campaign, Confederate Gen. John B. Floyd made his headquarters here, August 17-18, 1861, while Wise camped on the top of Big Sewell Mountain. In 1862, according to an inscription . . . — Map (db m59937) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Ansted — Westlake CemeteryBurial Place of Julia Jackson
This is one of the earliest identified cemeteries west of the Allegheny Mountains. William Tyree, owner of nearby Tyree Tavern, and Confederate Col. George W. Imboden, brother of Gen. John D. Imboden, are buried here. The cemetery is best known, . . . — Map (db m59193) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Boomer — Ancient Works
On a ridge between Armstrong and Loop creeks across the river are extensive prehistoric stone ruins whose walls are several miles long, and enclose a large area. Many of these stones are from the valley below the old wall. — Map (db m20820) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Fayetteville — Abraham Vandal
Plaque One Abraham Vandal 1758-1848 * Born in Dutchess, NY * Soldier in the American Revolutionary War 1776-1781 * Married Mary Dillon 1780 * Father of Eight Children * Early Fayetteville Settler * In 1812 Abraham . . . — Map (db m55816) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Fayetteville — Battle of FayettevilleDefense and Retreat
During the Civil War, Fort Scammon stood in front of you on the hill behind the courthouse. There, on September 10, 1862, Union Col. Edward Siber and the 1,500 men of his 37th Ohio Infantry defended Fayetteville against Confederate Gen. William . . . — Map (db m59214) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Fayetteville — Battle of Fayetteville (1862)/(1863)
(side 1) Battle of Fayetteville (1862) On September 10, 1862, soldiers under the command of Confederate Gen. W.W. Loring attacked Union forces in Fayetteville under Col. Edward Siber, driving them out of the town towards Charleston, . . . — Map (db m120516) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Fayetteville — Fayetteville
In the attack on Federal forces here, 1863. Milton W. Humphreys, the educator and soldier, gunner of Bryan's Battery, 13th Virginia Light Artillery, C.S.A., first used “indirect firing,” now in universal military use. — Map (db m55815) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Fayetteville — Fayetteville Town Park
Memorial Park was presented to citizens of Fayetteville to honor all veterans who served to defend their country. LaFayette Post No. 149, The American Legion, obtained lease for this property on August 4, 1958 from the New River Pocahontas Coal Co. . . . — Map (db m76724) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Fayetteville — Indirect Firing
Nearby on May 19-20, 1863, Corp. Milton W. Humphreys, gunner in Bryan's Battery, 13th Virginia Light Artillery, C.S.A., made first use of indirect artillery fire in warfare. Target was Union fort in Fayetteville. — Map (db m55814) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Fayetteville — Marquis de Lafayette(1757-1834)
Front Plaque French Statesman Friend of the American Revolution “...The new County so to be formed be called Lafayette or Fayette County to perpetuate a remembrance of his virtues and philanthropy through future ages of our . . . — Map (db m55817) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Fayetteville — Townsend's Ferry
John Townsend bought a large tract of land here in 1841, an area that became Lansing Ames Heights and Canyon rim Park. Operated a ferry that provided commercial transport across the river at site of present bridge until the civil war. Grandson . . . — Map (db m78288) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Fayetteville — Vandalia Cemetery
Masonic group owned property in 1854. Baptists worshipped here prior to Civil War, but building destroyed during the conflict. Contains 29 marked graves, including town's early settlers and soldiers of the Civil War. A number of graves are marked . . . — Map (db m76708) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Gauley Bridge — Battles For The BridgesGauley Bridge - A Town in Between
When the war began, most residents of this part of present-day West Virginia were Confederate in their sympathies. Both Confederate and Union forces considered the wooden covered bridge here strategically important because the James River and . . . — Map (db m34373) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Gauley Bridge — Gauley Bridge
Here New and Gauley rivers unite to form Great Kanawha River. Piers still stand of old bridge destroyed by the Confederate troops in 1861. Here Thomas Dunn English, author of the ballad, "Ben Bolt," wrote "Gauley River". — Map (db m20818) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Gauley Bridge — Hawk's Nest Tunnel
Mouth of the great Hawk's Nest Tunnel, three miles long, which diverts water of New River from its five-mile long gorge. The tunnel, a mile of which is through solid rock, and a 50-foot dam give waterfall of 160 feet for electric power. — Map (db m34421) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Glen Ferris — Camp Reynolds
Located across Kanawha River from this point was Civil War camp for Union Army, 1862-64. Site had 56 cabins and parade grounds for 23rd Ohio Vol. Inf. commanded by Col. Rutherford B. Hayes and Lt. William McKinley, future United States presidents. — Map (db m50397) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Glen Jean — Glen Jean Athletic Club
Directly across the street stood the Glen Jean Athletic Club. Alongside it was the ball bark. These, along with tennis and croquet courts, made Glen Jean a center for indoor and outdoor sports.

In New River’s coal towns, baseball was a . . . — Map (db m99966) HM

West Virginia (Fayette County), Hilton Village — Andrew & Charles Lewis March
The nearby highway is part of route traversing W.Va. from Lewisburg to Point Pleasant memorialized by the state to commemorate the march of the American Colonial army of 1,200 men led by Andrew & Charles Lewis. After a month's march this army . . . — Map (db m33809) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Lansing — New RiverAn Eastern Oddity
Nine hundred feet below, New River flows north. North? Odd in the American east where rivers don’t flow north. Oddities seem common at New River.

The river’s name and age are both unusual. No one knows the name’s origin: some say explorers . . . — Map (db m99982) HM

West Virginia (Fayette County), Lansing — New River Gorge National RiverWelcome
What is so special here? Why did the United States Congress in 1978 add New River Gorge to America’s system of National Parks? Because at New River Gorge National River there is:

(Inscriptions under the images-left to right, top to bottom) . . . — Map (db m99975) HM

West Virginia (Fayette County), Lansing — New River Gorge Scenic DrivesNew River Gorge National River
You may find it hard to believe that the New River Gorge was once teeming with activity. Coal mining dominated the economy and social structure of the state of West Virginia between 1875 and 1950. During this time over forty coal mining towns were . . . — Map (db m99974) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Lansing — Smoke, Coke, Coal, and KaymoorNew River Gorge
In the early 1900’s, mines and mining towns lined New River Gorge. One such town, Kaymoor, stood in the distance where the river disappears from view. Kaymoor typified New River’s mining era.

For years New River Gorge’s rugged remoteness . . . — Map (db m99988) HM

West Virginia (Fayette County), Lansing — The Bridge
Completed in 1977, New River Bridge is the world’s longest single-arch steel span bridge. At 876 feet above the river it is American’s 2nd-highest bridge.

Features to Notice Color. The steel used here, Cor-ten steel, rusts slightly on the . . . — Map (db m99996) HM

West Virginia (Fayette County), Lansing — The Deceptive ForestNew River Gorge
Notice the tree-covered slopes of the Gorge—they are not as they appear.

From here the solid forest cover from riverbottom to ridgetop all looks pretty much the same, but, a close look reveals great differences. The forest varies with . . . — Map (db m99980) HM

West Virginia (Fayette County), Lansing — Trail to Bridge OverlookNew River Gorge Bridge
This walkway leads to views of the New River Bridge. An easily-accessible upper overlook provides a scenic view framed by trees. From there the walkway descends 200 feet down a steep stairway to a broad view of the bridge, gorge, and New River 600 . . . — Map (db m99993) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Lookout — Spy Rock
Sandstone formation at 2510 feet is landmark known for view of Sewell Mt. range to SE. Known as "Rock of Eyes" by Native Americans and dubbed "Spy Rock" by Civil War soldiers. Sept. 1861, Gen. J.D. Cox and 5,000 Union soldiers camped here to oppose . . . — Map (db m34430) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Montgomery — Christopher H. Payne
Born in slavery in Monroe Co., Sept. 7, 1848, he worked as servant in the Confederate army. Served as teacher and ordained Baptist minister; estab. West Virginia Enterprise, Pioneer, & Mountain Eagle papers; later a lawyer. First . . . — Map (db m34413) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Montgomery — Fayette County / Kanawha County
Marker Front: Formed in 1831 from Nicholas, Greenbrier, Kanawha, Logan. Named for General Lafayette. On New River, 1671, Batts and Fallam officially claimed Mississippi Valley for Great Britain in opposition to the claim of France. . . . — Map (db m76931) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Montgomery — West Virginia Institute of Technology
State institution established in 1895 as Preparatory Branch of West Virginia University. In 1931, name was changed to New River State College. Became a multipurpose college in 1941, known as West Virginia Institute of Technology. — Map (db m76933) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Mossy — Coal Camp History
With railroads came thousands of workers looking to make a new life in the coalfields. In the late 1800’s and well into the mid-1900’s, many Appalachian miners lived in company towns called “Coal Camps”. Mine operators built . . . — Map (db m34443) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Mossy — MossyPaint Creek Scenic Trail — Raleigh, Fayette, & Kanawha Counties, WV
1913-Union organizer Mary "Mother" Jones imprisoned in Pratt. 1913-Approximate location of the striking miners tent colony that was fired on by mine guards wielding a machine gun mounted on the "Bull Moose" special train 1919-7 miners are . . . — Map (db m34438) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Mossy — The Rebirth of Paint Creek
Soon after settlers arrived in Paint Creek, the landscape and population changed forever with the discovery of coal. Within just a few years, mines began operating at Paint Creek under the ownership of New York businessman William Henry Greene. . . . — Map (db m34436) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Oak Hill — Oakwood Mine Complex
White Oak Fuel Company built the Oakwood Mine Complex in 1902. In 1915, 21 miners died when gas in the mine exploded. A year later, the original wooden tipple was upgraded to a multi-story steel structure. New River Company ran the mine after . . . — Map (db m76691) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Thurmond — The Heart of TownNew River Gorge National River
You are now in the heart of downtown Thurmond. In 1913 the Fayette Journal called Thurmond the “Biggest Little Town.” Today it is difficult to imagine why. Just three buildings survive from Thurmond’s once-thriving commercial district. . . . — Map (db m100011) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Thurmond — The Railroad Was the TownNew River Gorge National River
The rails that you see here symbolize Thurmond’s essence—the railroad. These rails were truly Thurmond’s main street. Coal was king, but was worthless if it couldn’t get to market. Workers in Thurmond’s engine house kept the C&O Railway’s coal . . . — Map (db m100020) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Thurmond — Thurmond DepotNew River Gorge National River
The Chesapeake and Ohio (C&O) Railway built this depot in 1904 to manage passengers and freight—mostly coal. This building replaced an earlier depot that burned the year before. The railroad was the only practical way in and out of New River . . . — Map (db m100008) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Thurmond — Thurmond, West VirginiaNew River Gorge National River
Here in Thurmond you-can recall the vital role that railroads played in the growth and prosperity of America. For more than 80 years Thurmond’s railroads thrived. Amid the remnants of this once-bustling town, you can imagine the sounds of steam . . . — Map (db m99973) HM
West Virginia (Fayette County), Thurmond — Thurmond’s DeclineNew River Gorge National River
Look down the railroad tracks. You might see a train coming. But if you do, you won’t see an engine fueled by coal, belching smoke and steam, as you would have during Thurmond’s heyday. Instead, you will see an engine powered with diesel fuel.

. . . — Map (db m100010) HM


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