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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Historical Markers and War Memorials in Frederick County, Virginia

 
Clickable Map of Frederick County, Virginia and Immediately Adjacent Jurisdictions image/svg+xml 2019-10-06 U.S. Census Bureau, Abe.suleiman; Lokal_Profil; HMdb.org; J.J.Prats/dc:title> https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Usa_counties_large.svg Frederick County, VA (175) Clarke County, VA (72) Shenandoah County, VA (204) Warren County, VA (43) Winchester Ind. City, VA (123) Berkeley County, WV (102) Hampshire County, WV (72) Hardy County, WV (37) Jefferson County, WV (340) Morgan County, WV (102)  FrederickCounty(175) Frederick County (175)  ClarkeCounty(72) Clarke County (72)  ShenandoahCounty(204) Shenandoah County (204)  WarrenCounty(43) Warren County (43)  (123) Winchester (123)  BerkeleyCountyWest Virginia(102) Berkeley County (102)  HampshireCounty(72) Hampshire County (72)  HardyCounty(37) Hardy County (37)  JeffersonCounty(340) Jefferson County (340)  MorganCounty(102) Morgan County (102)
Adjacent to Frederick County, Virginia
    Clarke County (72)
    Shenandoah County (204)
    Warren County (43)
    Winchester (123)
    Berkeley County, West Virginia (102)
    Hampshire County, West Virginia (72)
    Hardy County, West Virginia (37)
    Jefferson County, West Virginia (340)
    Morgan County, West Virginia (102)
 
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GEOGRAPHIC SORT
1Virginia (Frederick County), Albin — Second Battle of WinchesterLouisiana Tigers Capture West Fort — Gettysburg Campaign —
In June 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee marched his infantry from Culpeper County to the Shenandoah Valley to launch his second invasion of the North. First, however, he had to capture Winchester, the largest town on his line of communication, . . . — Map (db m2645) HM
2Virginia (Frederick County), Burnt Factory — Q 4-b — Jost Hite and Winchester
German emigrant Jost Hite and about 16 other German and Scots-Irish families from Pennsylvania came to this region in 1732, creating one of the early permanent European settlements. They settled along the Opequon Creek watershed south-west of the . . . — Map (db m2267) HM
3Virginia (Frederick County), Clear Brook — Hopewell Friends Meeting House
One mile west Meeting established 1734 since which time regular religious services have been held * Erected 1934 * — Map (db m2282) HM
4Virginia (Frederick County), Clear Brook — Z-291 — West Virginia / Frederick County
West Virginia. West Virginia was long a part of Virginia. Morgan Morgan began the settlement of the region in 1727. A great battle with the Indians took place as Point Pleasant, 1774. West Virginia became a separate state of the Union in . . . — Map (db m80323) HM
5Virginia (Frederick County), Gainesboro — GainesboroHarold H. Bageant Memorial Park
January 2, 1753 Jesse Pugh the elder, purchased a tract of land on both sides of Back Creek from Lord Fairfax. October 6, 1788 Job Pugh, son of Jesse Pugh Sr. drafted a charger of Pugh Town. April 20, 1805 Job Pugh sold to Jesse Pugh Jr., his . . . — Map (db m159480) HM
6Virginia (Frederick County), Gainesboro — The Stonewall Brigade at PughtownJanuary 1862
On a spring-like morning of January 1, 1862, the newly-promoted Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson set out from Winchester on the Bath-Romney campaign. This was the first step in Jackson's expedition to Romney in an effort to retake control . . . — Map (db m159479) HM
7Virginia (Frederick County), Gore — Z-217 — Frederick County Va. / West Virginia
(West Facing Side): Frederick County Va. Area 435 Square Miles Formed in 1738 from Orange and named for Frederick, Prince of Wales, father of King George III. Several battles were fought in the vicinity of Winchester 1862-1864 (East . . . — Map (db m3097) HM
8Virginia (Frederick County), Gore — B-18 — Willa Cather Birthplace
Here Willa Sibert Cather, the novelist, was born December 7, 1873. This community was her home until 1883, when her family moved to Nebraska. Nearby on Back Creek stands the old mill described in her novel Saphira and the Slave Girl. — Map (db m92498) HM
9Virginia (Frederick County), Gore — B-17 — Willow Shade
This house, built in 1858, was the childhood home of novelist Willa Cather from 1874 to 1883, when she moved with her family to Nebraska. It was the setting of the final chapters of her novel SAPPHIRA AND THE SLAVE . . . — Map (db m3095) HM
10Virginia (Frederick County), Green Spring — A-67 — Old Stone Church at Greenspring
One-half mile west at Greenspring stands the Old Stone Church, the second church building on the site, which was built in 1838 for a Lutheran congregation. The first church had been built as a subscription school and as a house of worship. Old Stone . . . — Map (db m7340) HM
11Virginia (Frederick County), Kernstown — 1790 Stone Church
These native limestone steps are in their original position and mark the main entrance to a 40' x 60' stone church built on this site in 1790. The entrance was in the center of its east wall with the pulpit area against the west wall. This church . . . — Map (db m2634) HM
12Virginia (Frederick County), Kernstown — A-9 — Battle of Kernstown
On the hill to the west, Stonewall Jackson late in the afternoon of March 23, 1862 attacked the Union force under Shields holding Winchester. After a fierce action, Jackson, who was greatly outnumbered, withdrew southward, leaving his dead on the . . . — Map (db m3150) HM
13Virginia (Frederick County), Kernstown — Battle of KernstownMarch 23, 1862
General James Shields with 7,000 Federals defeated Stonewall Jackson with 3,500 Confederates. Jackson's object was to create a diversion which would prevent troops being sent to McClellan for the attack on Richmond. He arrived south of Kernstown in . . . — Map (db m33024) HM
14Virginia (Frederick County), Kernstown — Battle of Kernstown
March 23, 1862 — Map (db m159147) WM
15Virginia (Frederick County), Kernstown — First Battle of Kernstown
Was fought here Sunday, March 23, 1862 Confederates under Gen. T.J. “Stonewall” Jackson attacked Federals under Gen. James Shields. The fighting was chiefly west of the road and continued from early afternoon until nightfall. When . . . — Map (db m2635) HM
16Virginia (Frederick County), Kernstown — A-11 — First Battle of Winchester
Here Confederate Maj. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson and his army, early on the morning of 25 May 1862, defeated Union Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Bank’s forces during Jackson’s Shenandoah Valley campaign. Banks, outnumbered and . . . — Map (db m2596) HM
17Virginia (Frederick County), Kernstown — In Memory of the Many Soldiers of the Revolution
In Memory of the many soldiers of the Revolution interred at Opequon Church of whom only seven are known Major John Gilkeson Captain William Chipley Captain Samuel Gilkeson Captain James Simrall Captain Samuel Vance Captain William Vance Private . . . — Map (db m2633) WM
18Virginia (Frederick County), Kernstown — In Memory of William Hoge (1660 - 1749) and His Wife Barbara Hume Hoge (1670 - 1745)Pioneer Settlers
Born in Scotland - Died in Kernstown Who lived on this land - Gave of it for this church and cemetery and are buried here — Map (db m159150) HM
19Virginia (Frederick County), Kernstown — Kernstown Battles
Around this site and a mile to the west occurred two major battles of the Civil War. First Kernstown March 23, 1862 Stonewall Jackson attacked what appeared to be a withdrawing federal force led by federal Br. Gen. Shields. Desperate fighting . . . — Map (db m2632) HM
20Virginia (Frederick County), Kernstown — 169 — Opequon Presbyterian ChurchAmerican Presbyterian and Reformed Historical Site
Early Years This historic church was established by Scotch-Irish and German settlers who migrated from eastern Pennsylvania in the early 1730’s. William Hoge donated two acres of land for a meeting house, and an additional two acres for a . . . — Map (db m122175) HM
21Virginia (Frederick County), Kernstown — 169 — Opequon Presbyterian Church
Early Years This historic church was established by Scotch-Irish and German settlers who migrated from eastern Pennsylvania in the early 1730s. William Hoge donated an additional two acres for a burying ground Two log and two stone houses of . . . — Map (db m159149) HM
22Virginia (Frederick County), Kernstown — Pettus Cousins in the Battle of First Kernstown
On May 2, 1861, after hearing that their home state of Virginia had seceded from the Union, John Hudson Petus, his younger cousin John Overton Pettus, and four other cousins from the Eubank family enlisted in the Keysville Guards as privates for . . . — Map (db m159179) HM
23Virginia (Frederick County), Kernstown — Second Battle of KernstownJuly 24, 1864
From this position near the Hoge Run creek bed, you have a view similar to that of the Confederate sharpshooters as they saw the Union defensive line along the stone wall by Pritchard's Lane. (Note that the creek bed has been significantly . . . — Map (db m159170) HM
24Virginia (Frederick County), Kernstown — A-8 — Second Battle of Winchester
On June 14, 1863, Jubal A. Early moved west from this point to attack Federal fortifications west of Winchester. — Map (db m2597) HM
25Virginia (Frederick County), Kernstown — The First Battle of KernstownFulkerson's Virginians Attack!
The low, marshy ground stretching from here to the distant road lay uncontested throughout the five-hour artillery duel that opened the First Battle of Kernstown. The scene changed dramatically at 2:00 p.m. when 900 Virginians marched toward this . . . — Map (db m159183) HM
26Virginia (Frederick County), Kernstown — The Pritchard HouseA Family Caught in the Midst of War!
The large brick dwelling before you is the Pritchard House, built in 1854 by Stephen Pritchard, Jr. and his son, Samuel Pritchard. During the Civil War Samuel, his wife Helen, and their two small children occupied the house. Fighting swirled . . . — Map (db m159182) HM
27Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — 128th New York Volunteer Regiment
Dedicated on 15 October 1907, this monument is adjacent to the original Valley Pike right of way. It marks the eastern limit of the XIX U.S. Corps positions occupied on 19 October 1864 and is at the approximate point where U.S. Generals Horatio G. . . . — Map (db m3397) HM
28Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — 128th Regt N.Y.S.V.I.
In Memory of The Men of This Regiment Who Lost Their Lives at the Battle of Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864 Erected by Their Comrades and Friends Dedicated in 1907 — Map (db m117458) WM
29Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — 1st Maine Battery
Captain Eben D. Haley's 1st Maine Light Artillery occupied a knoll behind the contact point of Colonel Daniel Macaulay's 3rd Brigade and Brigadier General Henry W. Birge's 1st Brigade. The battery quickly came under Confederate artillery fire and . . . — Map (db m3427) HM
30Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — A Rich Prize7:00 a.m. — Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park —
Belle Grove was Union headquarters, and thus was surrounded by hundreds of supply wagons, ambulances and tents. As the Confederate advance neared the plantation manor house there was a scramble to evacuate them to safely. Most escaped capture. . . . — Map (db m123963) HM
31Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — A-15 — Battle of Cedar Creek
Near this point General Early, on the morning of October 19, 1864, stopped his advance and from this position he was driven by Sheridan in the afternoon. — Map (db m568) HM
32Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Battle of Cedar CreekOctober 19, 1864
General Philip Sheridan defeated General Jubal Early here for the third time in 30 days. Sheridan’s pursuit of Confederates from Fisher’s Hill halted at Mount Crawford. On his return he encamped his three corps in this immediate area. Early followed . . . — Map (db m581) HM
33Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Battle of Cedar Creek
The Battle of Cedar Creek 19 October 1864 (a.m.) Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan’s Union forces established themselves on both sides of the Valley Pike, north of Cedar Creek, centered on Belle Grove. Confederate Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early . . . — Map (db m15171) HM
34Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — A-56 — Battle of Cedar Creek
In early Oct. 1864, portions of Union Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan’s army bivouacked here on the hills and rolling farmland just north of Cedar Creek along the Valley Turnpike (present-day U.S. Rte. 11). Just before daybreak on 19 Oct., Confederate . . . — Map (db m50310) HM
35Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Battle of Cedar Creek
The Battle of Cedar Creek 19 October 1864 (a.m.) Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan’s Union forces established themselves on both sides of the Valley Pike, north of Cedar Creek, centered on Belle Grove. Confederate Lt. Gen. Jubal A. . . . — Map (db m78063) HM
36Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Battle of Cedar CreekUnion Left Flank — 1864 Valley Campaign —
(Preface): The fertile Shenandoah Valley was the "Breadbasket of the Confederacy" as well as an avenue of invasion. Confederate Gen. Jubal A. Early's march north and his raid on Washington, D.C., in June-July 1864 alerted Union Gen. Ulysses . . . — Map (db m78137) HM
37Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Battle of Cedar Creek 1864
CS - US — Map (db m117594) WM
38Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Battlefield Center
From this position (Belle Grove Mansion is west of here) most of the VI and XIX U.S. Corps camps were visible on 19 October 1864. The XIX Corps camped close to their earthworks along the ridge to the south. VI Corps units were placed along the . . . — Map (db m3363) HM
39Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Bearing the BruntCedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
On October 15, 1907, veterans of the 128th New York Regiment met on the Cedar Creek battlefield to dedicate the monument to their unit. These men, along with the rest of the 19th Corps, had borne the brunt of the Confederate attack against their . . . — Map (db m117461) HM
40Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Cedar CreekThe 8th Vermont Vol's
Genl. Stephen Thomas commanding brigade advanced across the Pike the morning of Oct. 19, 1864. Engaged the enemy near and beyond this point, and before sunrise lost in killed and wounded 110 men. Three color bearers were shot down and 13 out of 16 . . . — Map (db m158568) HM
41Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Cedar Creek Battlefield and Belle Grove
Cedar Creek Battlefield and Belle Grove has been designated a Registered National Historic Landmark under the jurisdiction of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935. This site possesses exceptional value in commemorating or illustrating the . . . — Map (db m92700) HM
42Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Colonel Charles Russell Lowell
Commanding Reserve Brigade Cavalry Corps Army of the Shenandoah Fell in action near this place October 19, 1864 Useful Citizen * Gallant Soldier He died too early for his country (reverse side) Cedar . . . — Map (db m1868) HM
43Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — A-14 — End Of Sheridan’s Ride
This knoll marks the position of the Union Army when Sheridan rejoined it at 10:30 A.M., October 19, 1864, in the Battle of Cedar Creek. His arrival, with Wright's efforts, checked the Union retreat. — Map (db m577) HM
44Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — A-16 — Engagement Of Middletown
Here Stonewall Jackson, on May 24, 1862, attacked Banks retreating from Strasburg and forced him to divide his army. — Map (db m578) HM
45Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Eve of BattleCedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
On the night of October 18, 1864, tents sheltering part of General Philip Sheridan's 32,000 strong Union Army of the Shenandoah blanketed the fields before you. Numerous supply wagons stood around Belle Grove. Above the banks of Cedar Creek, more . . . — Map (db m117576) HM
46Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Z-179 — Frederick County / Shenandoah County
(South Facing Side): Frederick County Area 485 Square Miles Formed in 1738 from Orange, and named for Frederick, Prince of Wales, Father of King George III. Several battles were fought in the vicinity of Winchester, 1862-1864. (North . . . — Map (db m3430) HM
47Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Heater Fields
The 2nd (Vermont) Brigade of the 2nd Division, VI U.S. Corps, briefly deployed around the Heater House as skirmishers in the first federal effort to stop the 19 October 1864 Confederate morning attack. When this proved unfeasible, the entire . . . — Map (db m155787) HM
48Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Heater House
Probably built around 1800, this clapboard-covered log house was once the center of a prosperous 600 acre farm owned by Solomon and Caroline Wunder Heater. Although two of her sons died in Confederate service, Mrs. Heater, a native of Pennsylvania, . . . — Map (db m155785) HM
49Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — In Honor of Joist Hite (1685-1761)
Pioneer settler of the Shenandoah Valley — Map (db m158577) HM
50Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — A-105 — Middletown
The Virginia General Assembly established Middletown in 1794. Dr. Peter Senseney laid out the original lots for the village. Surrounded by farms and plantations, including historic Belle Grove, the community grew along the Great Wagon Road, which . . . — Map (db m1862) HM
51Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Middletown Virginia
. . . — Map (db m158585) HM
52Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Molineux's 2nd Brigade
The westernmost brigade of U.S. Brigadier General Cuvier Grover's 2nd Division, XIX U.S. Corps, the 2nd Brigade first came under pressure when C.S. Major General Joseph B. Kershaw's Division attacked its front and left. Then C.S. Major General John . . . — Map (db m3428) HM
53Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Monte Vista
This Property Has Been placed on the National Register of Historic Places By the United States Department of the Interior Circa 1883 — Map (db m78060) HM
54Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — N.C. Troops at Cedar Creek
Brig Gen John Pegram’s Division Lt Col William Davis Brigade (Formerly Brig Gen Archibald Godwin’s) 6th North Carolina 21st North Carolina 54th North Carolina 57th North Carolina Brig Gen Robert D. Johnston’s Brigade 5th North . . . — Map (db m123872) HM WM
55Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Old Hall at Belle Grove
In 1783, Isaac Hite, Jr. married Nelly Madison Hite of Montpelier, and acquired by grant from his father the 483 acre tract that was to become the center of Belle Grove Plantation. Until the elegant manor house was built between 1794 and 1797, the . . . — Map (db m44581) HM
56Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Old Hall at Belle Grove
When Isaac Hite, Jr. and Nelly Conway Madison of Montpelier were married in 1783, they received from his father a 48-acre tract that became the centerpiece of Belle Grove Plantation. Old Hall, as it is known today, was already in place at the . . . — Map (db m158576) HM
57Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — A-37 — Old Stone Fort
One mile west is the old stone fort, built about 1755. The northern end is loop-holed for defense against indians. — Map (db m569) HM
58Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Plantation Office & Store
This is the oldest building still standing at Belle Grove. Established as part of Isaac Hite Jr.'s plantation, the construction date of 1788 comes from dendrochronology, the analysis of tree ring growth in the wood used for the beams of the . . . — Map (db m158566) HM
59Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Plantation SlaveryCedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
In the Shenandoah Valley, small family farms were the norm but plantations did exist, including Belle Grove. Major Isaac Hite, Jr. and his family recorded 276 enslaved people that they owned between 1783 and 1851. Some worked raising crops of . . . — Map (db m158575) HM
60Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Ramseur Monument
Esse Quam Videri Northwest of this tablet, 800 yards, is the Belle Grove House in which died, October 20, 1864, of wounds received at Cedar Creek October 19, 1864, Maj.-Gen. Stephen Dodson Ramseur, C.S.A. A native of North Carolina, he . . . — Map (db m18684) HM
61Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Shenandoah At WarOne story… a thousand voices
If this Valley is lost, Virginia is lost! —General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson
During the American Civil War, control of the Shenandoah Valley was critical to the fate of Virginia and the . . . — Map (db m158569) HM
62Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Slowing the AdvanceThe Morning Attack Trails — Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park —
Following the successful Confederate surprise attack, Union forces from the 8th and 19th corps formed battle lines across the woods and fields in front of you, in the hopes of slowing the overwhelming Southern assault moving in this direction. . . . — Map (db m158565) HM
63Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — The Battle of Cedar Creek
Fought on these hills and fields, Oct 19, 1864. Gen. Jubal A. Early's 22,000 Confederates attacked Gen. Philip H. Sheridan's 60,000 Federals. The first assault a surprise flank movement by Gen. John B. Gordon, was a Confederate success. This . . . — Map (db m3380) HM
64Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — The Battle of Cedar CreekBy Julian Scott
In 1870 the Vermont Legislature commissioned a painting for the State House by artist Julian Scott to commemorate the valor of the state's Civil War soldiers. The Battle of Cedar Creek, in which more Vermont regiments were under fire than any . . . — Map (db m78349) HM
65Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — The Cauldron
The defense of the high ground around Middletown Cemetery by the 2nd Division, U. S. VI Corps, stopped the Confederate momentum. Confederate forces from the divisions of Generals Stephen D. Ramseur and Gabriel Wharton regrouped in the area between . . . — Map (db m36752) HM
66Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — The Enslaved Burial Ground
The fenced area within the orchard is believed to be a burial ground for some of the men, women, and children enslaved by the Hite family at Belle Grove. As is typical at many such graveyards, simple uninscribed stones mark the graves. Additional . . . — Map (db m158581) HM
67Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — The Shenandoah Valley / Battle of Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
The Shenandoah Valley Welcome to Virginia's Shenandoah Valley, renowned in story and song. The valley has been home to American Indians and early settlers from Germany, Ireland, and Scotland who followed the Indians' Warrior Path and turned . . . — Map (db m158561) HM
68Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — A-17 — Tomb Of An Unknown Soldier
On the highest mountain top to the southeast is the grave of an unknown soldier. The mountain top was used as a signal station by both armies, 1861-1865. — Map (db m586) HM
69Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Union Camps
Federal wagons and teams were in camp, close to and along the pike, while the shelter tents of the soldiers were arranged close to the earthworks themselves. By 8 A.M. on 19 October 1864, the area was filled with withdrawing units and individuals, . . . — Map (db m91963) HM
70Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Union Trenches
The main portion of the XIX U.S. Corps earthworks began here and extended one mile westward. Colonel Daniel Macaulay's 3rd Brigade, a part of Brigadier General Cuvier Grover's 2nd Division, occupied them with the 128th New York and 38th . . . — Map (db m3399) HM
71Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Union Withdrawal
Elements of Brigadier General James W. MacMillan's 1st Division, XIX U.S. Corps, left their part of the earthworks to fight C.S. Major General John B. Gordon's men closer to the Valley Pike. When Colonel Edward L. Molineux's and Brigadier General . . . — Map (db m3429) HM
72Virginia (Frederick County), Middletown — Vermont at Cedar Creek
Vermont soldiers played an important role in the Union victory at Cedar Creek. In a desperate stand made to slow the early morning onslaught of confederate Jubal Early’s army, the Eighth Vermont Regiment lost 110 of its 164 men engaged. The First . . . — Map (db m155786) HM
73Virginia (Frederick County), Star Tannery — Z-283 — Frederick County / Shenandoah County
Frederick County. Area 485 Square Miles. Formed in 1738 from Orange, and named for Frederick, Prince of Wales, Father of King George III. Several battles were fought in the vicinity of Winchester, 1862–1864. Shenandoah . . . — Map (db m9251) HM
74Virginia (Frederick County), Stephens City — Andrew Pitman House
This lot was purchased by Andrew Pitman (1760-1838) on August 17, 1782, upon his return from service in the Revolutionary War. He enlisted in the Virginia Militia from 1777 to 1781, and was at Yorktown when Cornwallis surrendered. Upon his . . . — Map (db m158598) HM
75Virginia (Frederick County), Stephens City — A-12 — House of First Settler
Springdale, home of Colonel John Hite, son of Joist Hite, leader of the first settlers in this section, was built in 1753. Just to the South are ruins of Hite’s Fort, built about 1734. — Map (db m2255) HM
76Virginia (Frederick County), Stephens City — Hunter's Raid BeginsHunter's Order to Burn Newtown — Hunter's Raid —
On May 26, 1864, Union Gen. David Hunter marched south from Cedar Creek near Winchester to drive out Confederate forces, lay waste to the Shenandoah Valley, and destroy railroads at Lynchburg. His raid was part of Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's . . . — Map (db m158593) HM
77Virginia (Frederick County), Stephens City — In Memory of All American Veterans
This memorial is dedicated to the men and women whose service in times of war and of peace defines the character of our Great Republic. Let us always be mindful of the sacrifices made to preserve our freedom and our liberties and to protect . . . — Map (db m158589) WM
78Virginia (Frederick County), Stephens City — NewtownBurnings and Hangings — 1864 Valley Campaign —
As the Federal army attempted to conquer and hold the Valley in 1864, its lines of supply and communication were extended and became susceptible to attack by bands of Confederate partisans. On May 24, 1864, under orders from Union Gen. David . . . — Map (db m41658) HM
79Virginia (Frederick County), Stephens City — Newtown Stephensburg Historic District
Settled in 1732 by Peter Stephens Chartered in 1758 by Lewis Stephens Became Stephens City in 1880 — Map (db m158590) HM
80Virginia (Frederick County), Stephens City — A-12 — Stephens City
General David Hunter ordered the burning of this town on May 30, 1864; but Major Joseph Streans of the First New York Cavalry prevented it. — Map (db m580) HM
81Virginia (Frederick County), Stephens City — A 127 — Stephens Family
Peter and Maria Stephens, German immigrants, settled here with their children in 1732. They had come from Pennsylvania with a group led by Jost Hite to form the Opequon settlement, a set of dispersed homesteads in this region. Archaeology reveals . . . — Map (db m158587) HM
82Virginia (Frederick County), Stephens City — The Old GraveyardLots #76 & 77
"The Old Graveyard" is composed of town lots number 76 & 77, each a half acre in area. On January 17, 1799 they were deeded by Lewis Stephens, Jr. to the following thirteen Trustees: David Wilson, William McLeod, William Elsea, Ebenezer, Potter, . . . — Map (db m158591) HM
83Virginia (Frederick County), Stephenson — A-1 — Action at Stephenson’s Depot
Near this place on June 15, 1863, Confederate troops of General Edward “Allegheny” Johnson’s Division attacked and routed General Robert Milroy’s Union Army during its retreat from Winchester. The short, pre-dawn battle resulted in the . . . — Map (db m2329) HM
84Virginia (Frederick County), Stephenson — Jordan SpringsHealing Springs
During the Civil War, both United States and Confederate forces used Jordan Springs resort as a hospital at different times. Wounded and sick Confederate soldiers from the Antietam and Gettysburg battlefields came to the springs—although . . . — Map (db m2358) HM
85Virginia (Frederick County), Stephenson — Stephenson Depot"The Thermopylae of my campaign.”
In the spring of 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia began a march that culminated at the Battle of Gettysburg. Lee chose the Shenandoah Valley for his invasion route. Ninety-six hundred Federals under Gen. Robert . . . — Map (db m41659) HM
86Virginia (Frederick County), Stephenson — Third Battle of Winchester"One Moving Mass of Glittering Sabers" — 1864 Valley Campaigns —
On September 19, 1864, Union Gen. Philip H. Sheridan’s Army of the Shenandoah routed Confederate Gen. Jubal A. Early’s Valley Army at the Third Battle of Winchester (also called Opequon) in the bloodiest and largest battle in the Shenandoah Valley. . . . — Map (db m100977) HM
87Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — "Like A Thousand Bricks"The Union Cavalry Charge — The Third Battle of Winchester (September 19, 1864) —
Time: Late Afternoon Standing on this spot on the afternoon of September 19, 1864, you would have witnessed — about a mile to your front — one of the most spectacular scenes of the Civil War... and one of the largest cavalry charges . . . — Map (db m155040) HM
88Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — “Shrapnel Rained On Us”The Union Attack Across Redbud Run — The Third Battle of Winchester (September 19, 1864) —
Time: Mid-Afternoon At 3 pm, Union Gen. George Crook advanced Col. Isaac Duval's division through the fields of the Huntsberry Farm on the north bank of Red Bud Run, which you can see directly across from you. On this side of the run, . . . — Map (db m159418) HM
89Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — 2nd Battle of WinchesterJune 13–15, 1863
General Richard S. Ewell with 14,000 Confederates defeated General Robert H. Milroy with 6,900 Federals. Prior to his second invasion of the North, Lee sent Ewell to Winchester to clear the Valley of Federals. Dividing his forces, Ewell on June 14th . . . — Map (db m2518) HM
90Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — 2nd Battle of Winchester / 3rd Battle of Winchester
2nd Battle of Winchester June 13-15, 1863 3rd Battle of Winchester September 19, 1864 — Map (db m159481) HM WM
91Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — 3rd Battle of WinchesterSeptember 19, 1864
In the late summer of 1864 General Philip H. Sheridan with 41,000 Federals was ordered to take the vital Shenandoah Valley. Opposing this force was a Confederate army of 18,000 under General Jubal A. Early stationed north and east of Winchester. On . . . — Map (db m155165) HM
92Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — A Murderous FireConfederate Horse Artillery on Huntsberry Farm — The Third Battle of Winchester (September 19, 1864) —
Time: Late Morning (sidebar) Six Confederate cannon were positioned here during the battle, erupting with flame and smoke as they sent a rain of deadly shells across Red Bud Run. The noise would have been deafening. This was one of . . . — Map (db m159159) HM
93Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — A-2 — Action of Rutherford’s Farm
Near here, the Confederate General Stephen D. Ramseur was attacked by General William W. Averell and pushed back toward Winchester, July 20, 1864. — Map (db m12091) HM
94Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — AlabamaBattle's Brigade — Third Battle of Winchester —
(front) During the Third Battle of Winchester on September 19, 1864, it was near this spot that Brig. Gen. Battle's Alabama Brigade reached their farthest advance. Erected by the family of CDR. Craig A. Morin USNR (Ret.) 2019 . . . — Map (db m155706) WM
95Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — Battle of Rutherford's FarmUnion Victory
Confederate Gen. Jubal A. Early attacked the defenses of Washington, D.C., in July 1864, then retreated to the Shenandoah Valley. Union Gen. Horatio G. Wright pursued him, and after a sharp fight and Confederate victory at Cool Spring on July 18, . . . — Map (db m13988) HM
96Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — Captain Robert Young Conrad
In Memory of Robert Young Conrad Captain Co. I, 116th Inf. 29th Division Son of Major Holmes and Georgia Byran Conrad who was mortally wounded while leading a charge on a machine gun nest at Ormont Farm in the Meuse . . . — Map (db m136364) WM
97Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — A-3 — Capture of Star Fort
The fort on the hilltop to the southwest, known as Star Fort, was taken by Colonel Schoonmaker of Sheridan’s Army in the Battle of September 19, 1864. — Map (db m2275) HM
98Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — Civil War Earthworks"Where they are compelled by nature ... to resort to it"
During the Civil War, armies of both sides built earthwork fortifications of varying sizes and shapes. The star fort was one of the most difficult types to construct. Although the design afforded the defenders the potential to fire into an attacking . . . — Map (db m100976) HM
99Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — Z-122 — Clark County / Frederick County
Clark County. Area 171 Square Miles. — Formed in 1836 from Frederick and added to from Warren. Named for George Rogers Clark, conqueror of the Northwest. Lord Fairfax and General Daniel Morgan, Revolutionary Hero, lived in this . . . — Map (db m156734) HM
100Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — B-16 — Colonel John Singleton Mosby
This road, along which many of his skirmishes took place, is named for Colonel John Singleton Mosby, commander of the 43rd Battalion of the Confederate Partisan Rangers. Their activities in this area helped keep the Confederate cause alive in . . . — Map (db m2668) HM

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Jan. 16, 2021