Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

The Historic National Road Historical Markers

“The Road that Built the Nation.” The first (1811) federally funded road in the U.S. ran from Baltimore, Maryland to Vandalia, Illinois.
 
History of Greenville-Bond County Marker image, Touch for more information
By William Fischer, Jr., July 18, 2010
History of Greenville-Bond County Marker
Illinois (Bond County), Greenville — History of Greenville-Bond County
Illinois Confederacy Indians roamed this prairie land, rich in game, which became Illinois County of Virginia. Ceded in 1784 to the United States it was successively included in the Northwest, Indiana; and in 1809, Illinois Territory. Formed in . . . — Map (db m34169) HM
Illinois (Clark County), Marshall — Old Stone Arch Bridge
This Bridge was completed by Army Engineers sometime between 1834 and 1837 as part of the Old National Road, between Cumberland, Maryland and Vandalia, Illinois, was authorized by the enabling act of 1803 and was the Nation's first federally . . . — Map (db m71127) HM
Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Cumberland Road
Vandalia was the western terminus of the Cumberland or National Road which extended eighty feet wide for 591 miles from Cumberland, Maryland through Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana. Illinois construction by the Federal Government began in 1811 and . . . — Map (db m42345) HM
Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — Madonna of the TrailThe National Old Trails Road
N·S·D·A·R Memorial to the Pioneer Mothers of the Covered Wagon Days The Cumberland Road. Built by the Federal Government. Was authorized by Congress and approved by Thomas Jefferson in 1806. Vandalia marks the . . . — Map (db m42341) HM
Illinois (Fayette County), Vandalia — William C. GreenupAug. 28, 1785 - June 10, 1853
Born in Maryland. Clerk of First General Assembly of Illinois Territory, Kaskaskia 1812. Clerk of House of Representatives and of Legislative Council, 1815. Clerk of Constitutional Convention 1818. Secretary of Senate 1818-20. Chief Surveyor of . . . — Map (db m42374) HM
Indiana (Henry County), Knightstown — The National Road — West
Knightstown—first town platted on National Road after survey, 1827—named after noted surveyor Jonathan Knight. Home of American Communications Network founded, in 1966, to preserve and perpetuate the “Ideals that built . . . — Map (db m271) HM
Indiana (Marion County), Indianapolis — The National Road
Cumberland M.D. to Terre Haute Ind. 1806 - 1839 — Map (db m99992) HM
Indiana (Vigo County), Terre Haute — 84.1998.1 — Crossroads of America
U.S. Highway 40, the old National Road which opened the West for settlement, and U.S. Highway 41, a major North-South route, were designated part of the original Federal Highway System in 1926. Their intersection in Terre Haute at Wabash Avenue and . . . — Map (db m8925) HM
Indiana (Wayne County), Cambridge City — 89.1992.2 — Cambridge City
A transportation center, platted 1836 along the Whitewater River, the Cumberland/National Road, and the Whitewater Canal route. Four steam railroads served the town; interurban electric railroad opened 1903. Cambridge City Historic District listed . . . — Map (db m63949) HM
Indiana (Wayne County), Centerville — Historic National Road / Make History, Drive ItThe Road That Built The Nation
(Side One) Historic National Road The Road That Built The Nation Pike Towns The National Road--along which you now stand—arrived here in Centerville in 1832. Centerville was an early "pike town". Regularly . . . — Map (db m69309) HM
Indiana (Wayne County), Richmond — Madonna of the Trail
(Southwest Face) N.S.D.A.R. Memorial to the Pioneer Mothers of the Covered Wagon Days. (Northwest Face) A Nation's Highway! Once a wilderness trail over which hardy pioneers made their perilous way seeking new homes in the dense forests of the . . . — Map (db m244) HM
Indiana (Wayne County), Richmond — The First Toll Gate
This tablet marks the site of the first toll gate in the state of Indiana erected about 1850. — Map (db m288) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — “The Narrows”
One of the most picturesque spots around Cumberland, discovered by Spendelow after the road over Wills Mountain had been constructed by General Braddock. Adopted as the route of the Cumberland Road (The National Road) 1833. The old stone bridge . . . — Map (db m4927) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Cumberland Gateway Westward — Fort Cumberland Trail
Will's Creek Settlement, later known as Cumberland, served as a major gateway for trade, military campaigns against the French, and settlement beyond the mountains in our growing nation. "The New Storehouses" of the Ohio Company were across the . . . — Map (db m17783) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — The NarrowsAn Easier Route for the National Road
At first, the National Road climbed west from Cumberland up and over Haystack Mountain. In the 1830s, when the road was rebuilt, a new route was chosen. It would be a mile longer but the grade was substantially decreased so that horse teams could . . . — Map (db m4926) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — The National Road(Called The Cumberland Road)
Was the first of the internal improvements undertaken by the U.S. Government. Surveys were authorized in 1806 over the route of “Braddock’s Road,” which followed “Nemacolin’s Path,” an Indian trail, over which George . . . — Map (db m444) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m67479) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — The Old National Pike — Fort Cumberland Trail
The National Pike was also called the National Road (used national funds) or the Cumberland Road (began in Cumberland). Behind you and to the right along the base of the hill, were the storehouses of The Ohio Company. The earliest rails were made by . . . — Map (db m18728) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Where the Road BeganThe Historic National Road - The Road That Built the Nation
You are standing at the starting point of this country's first federal road building project, the National Road. A vision of George Washington as a means to develop the continent and to unite the country, his idea was championed by Thomas Jefferson . . . — Map (db m17716) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Flintstone — Martins MountainSunday Drivers and “Tin-Can Tourists"
The National Road enjoyed a revival from about 1910-1960, with the rising popularity of the automobile. Tourist travel began in earnest when cars became reliable enough for the average person to take a long trip. “Waysiders,” people who . . . — Map (db m4922) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Frostburg — Blazing Braddock's Road
“We this day passed the ‘Aligany’ Mountain (Big Savage Mountain) which is a rocky ascent of more than two miles, in many places extremely steep…” Captain Robert Orme, June 15, 1755 British General Edward Braddock led a . . . — Map (db m5013) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Frostburg — FrostburgThe Frost Family Legacy
Years before St. Michael’s Church was built, Meshach Frost and his wife Catherine purchased this property in 1812. When the Frosts bought the property, construction of the National Road was already underway. They soon found they were feeding . . . — Map (db m3551) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Frostburg — FrostburgThe National Road, Coal and Fancy Hotels
The National Road has sustained Frostburg for almost two centuries. As the road was being surveyed in 1811, Josiah Frost began laying out lots. Businesses, serving passing stagecoaches and wagons, soon lined a developing Main Street. By . . . — Map (db m3553) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Frostburg — The Naming of Frostburg
Contrary to popular belief that it was named for its frigid winter weather, Frostburg can trace its history back to 1800 when the community was known as Mt. Pleasant. By the time the National Road (authorized by Congress in 1806) opened through in . . . — Map (db m67475) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), La Vale — First Toll Gate House
First toll gate house on the old National (Cumberland) Road. Erected about 1833 after this portion of the road was turned over to the State of Maryland by the United States government. There was one other toll gate in Maryland on this Road. — Map (db m442) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), La Vale — The La Vale Toll House
Toll houses were built along the National Road as a result of a 25 year national debate as to whether or not the federal government should be responsible for funding road improvements. While there was agreement on the idea that those who used the . . . — Map (db m443) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Little Orleans — Town Hill OverlookThe Beauty Spot of Maryland
The long, winding ascent of Town Hill reaches a height just beyond that of Sideling Hill, but was much more easily crossed. However, early automobiles were still no match for the steep grades and tight turns along this section of the National Road. . . . — Map (db m20986) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Gwynns Falls ValleyFrom Work to Play
As the Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike twisted and turned westward, it passed one of the centers of early city industry. A three mile long millrace on the Gwynns Falls provided power for over twenty mills that sawed wood, ground flour, wove . . . — Map (db m4940) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — IrvingtonThe Last Stop before Baltimore
Before Irvington existed, eastbound travelers encountered the last hill on the Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike. The turnpike was part of the system of roads that connected to the National Road in Cumberland in 1806. During the 1800s, this . . . — Map (db m4941) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Railroads Eclipse a National Road“Thus will scientific power conquer space.”
For several decades in the early 1800s, thousands of Conestoga Wagons, “ships of inland commerce,” ruled the National Road. With their sloping bodies, wheels taller than a man and six-horse teams skillfully maneuvered with a single . . . — Map (db m5705) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — The Baltimore & Frederick-Town TurnpikeA Transportation Revolution started here
Maryland toll roads helped revolutionize American travel. The Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike began with a tollgate, placed near this corner in 1807. For a few cents, you could head west on a “smooth” road that was the ancestor of . . . — Map (db m5700) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m5703) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — The Port of BaltimoreThe National Road begins and ends here
Moving Goods Since 1729, Baltimore has owed its existence to its deepwater port. The city looks east to the Chesapeake Bay and ports around the world. It also looks west with access to markets in America’s heartland. It began with local farmers . . . — Map (db m6140) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — 6-Mile Marker on the National Road1787
This 6-miles-to-Baltimore marker was welcomed by thousands on horseback, in stagecoaches and wagons, who traveled this Frederick Turnpike. Some headed west to settle in the Ohio Valley, along with merchants selling their wares, while millers with . . . — Map (db m39347) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — Castle Thunder
A gift from Charles Carroll of Carrollton, Castle Thunder, the home of Richard and Mary Carroll Caton, stood on this site from 1787 to 1906. The 7-mile Frederick Turnpike stone marker of 1804 was moved here from its original position 3/10 mile . . . — Map (db m4910) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — CatonsvilleA Turnpike Town
This 1877 “Plan of Catonsville” lays outs all the possibilities of an energetic and emerging suburb of Baltimore, only eight miles, or a one-day carriage ride, to the east. The centerpiece of the town is the Frederick Turnpike, part of . . . — Map (db m5500) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — CatonsvilleFrom Stagecoaches to Horseless Carriages
The reign of stagecoaches and Conestoga Wagons on the Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike only lasted seventy years. Omnibuses, attached to teams of four horses, began rolling out from Baltimore to Catonsville in 1862. The Catonsville Short . . . — Map (db m5536) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — OellaConquering the “Nine Mile Hill"
The Ellicott brothers constructed what became the first leg of the Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike to get their flour to market in Baltimore. By 1787, they cut a new road east through the forests to shorten the trip to the city. This route . . . — Map (db m5741) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Mt. Airy — Parrsville & RidgevilleTwo Towns at the Four Corners
Here at Milestone 31, about 130 feet southeast of its original location, the Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike created two towns as it moved west. Both Parrsville and Ridgeville are now a part of Mount Airy. Parrsville, to the east, was named . . . — Map (db m4933) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — South Mountain SummitWhat an Ideal Location for a Break!
As early as 1750, Robert Turner bought land here on the top of South Mountain. The date of construction is unknown, but by 1790 a full-fledged inn was in operation at “Turner’s Gap.” Since then, the building has been in almost continuous . . . — Map (db m1600) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Braddock Heights — Hagan’s TavernIf walls could talk..
The National Road has borne witness to many notorious comings and goings. The quiet atmosphere you’ll find at Hagan’s Tavern today is quite different from the raucous bawdiness of yesteryear. This tavern was a “place where the old bloats of . . . — Map (db m2247) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — A Crossroads of American HistoryThe Frederick Square Corner
The Square Corner, at the intersection of Patrick and Market Streets, has long been the commercial and financial heart of Frederick. It is here that the National Road meets several important north-south roads that lead to Pennsylvania, Virginia, and . . . — Map (db m2748) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — A Good Night's RestFrederick's Hotel Block
This part of downtown Frederick has long been a place of lodging and hospitality for travelers along the National Road. Kimball's Inn, Talbott's Tavern, the City Hotel and the Francis Scott Key Hotel have occupied this site for over two hundred . . . — Map (db m104243) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — FrederickA Town becomes a City
Frederick Town was founded in 1745 when Daniel Dulany the Elder carved out an eastern portion of his 7,000 acre parcel patented as "Tasker's Chance." The town was then laid out in an orderly grid with Patrick Street designated as the east-west . . . — Map (db m2805) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Jacob EngelbrechtA Frederick Diarist on the National Road
In 1826, Jacob Engelbrecht moved to the house across the street near Carroll Creek. He began reporting on the National Road cavalcade that was going by his front door. His priceless diary recorded everything he saw. Travelers he observed included: . . . — Map (db m2706) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Jug BridgeAn engineering marvel for early America
In 1800, travelers expected to ford rivers or use ferries that were slow and often risky in bad weather. The Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike Company, building the first leg of the National Road in 1805, set out to revolutionize American roads. . . . — Map (db m2321) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Jug Bridge Monument
The stone demijohn and memorial plaque, placed by the Sons of the American Revolution, were originally located on a bridge crossing the Monocacy River about 2 miles east of this site. The stone bridge of four arches and two 65-foot spans was . . . — Map (db m2324) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m2753) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — Middletown“Middle of What?”
Noted for the tall white spire of the Zion Lutheran Church, Middletown has been framed by its picturesque valley for over two centuries. German Protestants, fleeing persecution in Europe, founded the community before the American Revolution. Michael . . . — Map (db m415) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Myersville — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m5921) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), New Market — Mile Stones of the old National Pike
Looking more like an ancient tombstone, the stone marker at the bottom of the hill before you, tucked inside the guardrail, was once used to denote mileage to Baltimore along the Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike, also known as the old National . . . — Map (db m5404) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), New Market — New MarketA New Town for a New Road
As Fredericktown was born in 1745, German farmers were already hauling their grain to the port of Baltimore. By the 1780s, new communities were springing up along busy wagon routes. Two speculators, Nicholas Hall and William Plummer, competed to . . . — Map (db m5746) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Friendsville — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, . . . — Map (db m83628) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Granstville — Castleman’s River Bridge(Formerly "Little Youghiogeny")
Erected 1813 by David Shriver, Jr., Sup't of the "Cumberland Road" (The National Road). This 80 foot span was the largest stone arch in America at the time. It was continuously used from 1813 to 1933. — Map (db m100) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Granstville — Early Inns
The Casselman Inn. You are standing in front of the Casselman Inn, which was opened in 1842 by Solomon Sterner. This establishment has also been known as Sterner House, Drovers' Inn, Farmers' Hotel and Dorsey Hotel. There was a large outdoor . . . — Map (db m360) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Grantsville — GrantsvilleA Heritage of Hospitality
When the National Road came through here in 1815, this settlement was a half mile away along the old Braddock Road. This “New Grantsville” developed just west of the Casselman Bridge, completed a few years earlier. About a dozen . . . — Map (db m477) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Grantsville — Keyser’s RidgeLiving with Extreme Weather
“I saw the wind blow so hard on Keyser’s Ridge, that it took six men to hold the hair on one man’s head.” In the early days of the National Road, this stretch was often “snowed up” with drifts up to twenty feet . . . — Map (db m514) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Grantsville — Leo J. BeachyPhotographing the National Road
“My camera lens does not lie. It took just what it saw, no more, no less.” –Leo Beachy Leo J. Beachy (1874–1927) left us a special legacy. One of seven children raised on a farm named Mt. Nebo, he lived in these . . . — Map (db m431) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Grantsville — Negro MountainThe Highest Point on the National Road
You have reached the highest point on the National Road. Here, in the far western mountains of Maryland is the backbone of eastern America. In 1817, the National Road construction crew took on the challenge of crossing this tough terrain by laying a . . . — Map (db m5409) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Grantsville — The Fuller-Baker HouseA Rare Log Building with a Pedigree
This humble log cabin is a rare survivor of a common dwelling built by early settlers on the Allegheny frontier. Built after 1813 as a two-story log building, its large size has led some to believe it was once used as a tavern, giving respite to . . . — Map (db m4921) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Grantsville — Traveling the National Road
Granstville's Main Street, designated today as Alt. Route 40, was once part of the National Road, the country's first federally funded highway. Visit our Town Park to learn more about the history of the National Road. Traffic on the National Road . . . — Map (db m359) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), McHenry — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m2171) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — Road Versus RailsThe Rivalry Begins
Ellicott City’s Main Street is the National Pike, part of the road system that moved Americans west. Only two decades after the road was constructed, a new transportation rival appeared. In 1831, America’s first railroad, the Baltimore & Ohio, . . . — Map (db m720) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — The National Road
This marker stands on a part of the right of way of the historic and fabled National, or Cumberland Road. Commencing in 1806 it was built in segments by city, state, federal, and private means and was the first great commercial and travel link from . . . — Map (db m131) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Lisbon — New LisbonServicing Travelers on the National Pike
“New Lisbon” was established by Quaker Caleb Pancoast in 1802, who saw both need and opportunity to service travelers along the length of the National Pike. He also welcomed all religious denominations into his home, and allowed it to be . . . — Map (db m5744) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Poplar Springs — Poplar Springs"From Drovers to Drivers"
In the early 1800s, as settlers spread west from the Chesapeake Bay, the farming community of Poplar Springs grew up around the Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike, part of the system of roads making up the National Road. An endless parade of . . . — Map (db m5024) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Poplar Springs — Simpson & Mount Gregory United Methodist ChurchesCreating a Unified Community of Strength
Methodist churches were a source and inspiration for the budding African-American community as people moved westward along the Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike, part of the National Road system. Both enslaved and free African-Americans . . . — Map (db m5745) HM
Maryland (Howard County), West Friendship — Moving Goods on the National Road
“Open a wide door, and make a smooth way for the produce of that Country to pass to our Markets.” George Washington, 1784 America’s founders looked west for the future success of the new country. The United States needed . . . — Map (db m5742) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m820) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m32677) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m1911) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Town of Boonsboro Maryland uses Macadam to Complete the National Road
The National Road from Baltimore to Cumberland was comprised of a series of privately funded turnpikes. By 1822, the road was complete except for the ten miles between Boonsboro and Hagerstown. In August of the year, under pressure from the state . . . — Map (db m1162) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — “The Bank Road”The Cumberland Turnpike Road
The portion of this highway from the west end of the Conococheague bridge to Cumberland (40 miles) was built between 1816 and 1821. The banks of Maryland financed it by purchase of the stock. — Map (db m699) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — A Road Nurtures A VisionThe Historic National Road and Clear Spring
“The citizens at all times aim to be surpassed by no other town in the County.” –Martin Lehr, Clear Spring historian, 1890’s. In 1821, Martin Myers chose a site that straddled a “clear spring” at the foot . . . — Map (db m694) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Miller's Tavern & Spickler's Buggy FactorySurreys, Stagecoaches and Tin Lizzies
The Miller Hotel was one of the most popular destinations along the National Road in Washington County. Traveler T.B. Seabright recalled in 1894 “There were large rooms adapted to dancing purposes, and young men and maidens of the vicinity . . . — Map (db m60556) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Springs — Wilson’s StoreStore of Three Wonders
"You wonder if we have it. We wonder where it is. You wonder how we found it!” That is how Janice Keefer remembered her father’s store during the 42 years that Dorsey Martin conducted business here. Originally opened by Rufus Wilson in 1850, . . . — Map (db m4932) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Baltimore StreetFunkstown’s Link to the Chesapeake
When the National Road was completed through Funkstown in 1823, a rush of “stagecoaches and wagon teams, droves of cattle, teamsters and travelers” flooded through the town. Although Baltimore was seventy miles to the east, the Funkstown . . . — Map (db m2007) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Building the Funkstown Bridge
“The turnpike bridge at Funkstown is the only one...which seems to belong to a town” —Helen Ashe Hays, The Antietam and its Bridges This bridge, finished in 1823, is perhaps the oldest one over Antietam Creek. . . . — Map (db m2010) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — HagerstownBringing Farm Products to Maryland's Great Valley
Following Jonathan Hager’s arrival in 1739, German and Scots-Irish immigrants settled in Maryland’s Great Valley, developing prosperous farms. By the mid 1790’s, agriculture was booming and the region needed a way to get its products to market. . . . — Map (db m6532) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Wilson BridgeLink Between East and West
Built in 1819, this five-arch structure, named for nearby village, was first stone bridge in Washington County. Erected by Silas Harry at cost of $12,000, it was a major improvement to road system between Baltimore and Cumberland, providing . . . — Map (db m697) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Wilson BridgeStanding the Test of Time
“Keep these bridges in proper repair and they will last as long as any. They have stood many hard knocks for a long time.” —Elmer E. Piper, Washington County Surveyor, 1920s. This graceful, five-arch structure, . . . — Map (db m698) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — HancockThe Busiest Village on the Road
“After the exhilaration of a gallop down the mountain without breaks, what appetite would not be set on edge, what refinement of palate displeased by venison cutlets, or even ham and eggs?” Harper’s Magazine, 1879 By . . . — Map (db m5931) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — National Pike Toll HouseCirca 1822
The significance of this structure lies both in its history and architecture. It is one of the few remaining “toll houses” along the old National Road. The National Road was chartered between Hancock and Cumberland in 1819 and completed . . . — Map (db m5799) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Sideling Hill and Town Hill Mountains
Rainwater enters the outcropping sandstones of Sideling Hill and collects in what is termed an aquifer. In this highway cut, the water runs out at the bottom of the fractured sandstone layers because it cannot go through the dense claystone below. . . . — Map (db m5543) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — The Challenge of Sideling Hill
“Our pleasure trips usually stopped at the top of the mountain because of the hairpin turn to the right that dropped into a severely sharp curve.” This route is an ancient one. Our traveling ancestors pushed across, . . . — Map (db m825) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m824) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — The National RoadThe Road that Built a Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m830) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Myersville — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m671) HM
Ohio (Belmont County), Belmont — 2-7 — Mile Marker
The earliest highway signs along the National Road (Route 40) in Ohio were milestones located at one-mile intervals along the north side of the roadway. Each stone indicated the distance to Cumberland, Maryland, the eastern terminus of the National . . . — Map (db m78496) HM
Ohio (Belmont County), Blaine — 11-7 — Blaine Hill "S" Bridge / Blaine Hill Viaduct
Blaine Hill "S" Bridge The first Blaine Hill Bridge was constructed in 1828 as part of the National Road, the nation's first federally funded highway. This three-arch S-shaped structure, 345 feet in length, spans Wheeling Creek (a tributary of . . . — Map (db m12618) HM
Ohio (Belmont County), Bridgeport — 4-7 — Historic Bridgeport
Colonel Ebenezer Zane, one of the founders of Wheeling, laid out the village that became Bridgeport in 1806 on the site of Fort Kirkwood (1789). Originally named Canton, it acquired its present name after the bridge to Wheeling Island was built. The . . . — Map (db m515) HM
Ohio (Belmont County), Bridgeport — The National Historic Road in OhioThe Road That Helped Build The Nation — An All-American Road - National Scenic Highway
Welcome to the National Road The National Road crosses six states from Baltimore, Maryland, to East St. Louis, Illinois. The road fulfilled the dreams of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson to build an all-weather route across the Allegheny . . . — Map (db m78502) HM
Ohio (Belmont County), Elizabethtown — 1-7 — Mile Marker
The earliest highway signs along the National Road (Route 40) in Ohio were milestones located at one-mile intervals along the north side of the roadway. Each stone indicated the distance to Cumberland, Maryland, the eastern terminus of the National . . . — Map (db m21058) HM
Ohio (Belmont County), Morristown — 10-7 — Morristown
Platted in 1802 by John Zane and William Chapline along the old Wheeling Road. Morristown was named for Duncan Morrison, an early settler, innkeeper, and Justice of the Peace. Older than the state itself. Morristown prospered into the mid-1800s, . . . — Map (db m287) HM
Ohio (Belmont County), St. Clairsville — Milestone Marks where Extension of National Road...
Milestone marks where extension of National Road west of Ohio River was started July 4, 1825. Stone relocated 1964 — Map (db m5027) HM
Ohio (Clark County), South Vienna — Buena Vista TavernThe Historic National Road in Ohio — Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century Travel Accommodations
Built in 1836, the Buena Vista Tavern operated as an inn from 1849 to 1856, when it became a private residence. In 1930, it returned to public life as a tourist camp with cabins or cottages located behind the old inn. The Buena Vista Tavern is . . . — Map (db m86729) HM
Ohio (Clark County), Springfield — Esplanade/Fountain Square
Since 1826, the Esplanade has been the traditional center of Springfield and Clark County. The National Road passed within one block of “Market Square” as it was then called. Three city halls, several hotels, train stations, and numerous . . . — Map (db m13316) HM
Ohio (Clark County), Springfield — Madonna of the Trail
In 1912, Congress appropriated funds for a new highway, the National Old Trails Road, or Ocean-to-Ocean Highway. The route crossed 12 states from Maryland to California following much of the National Road and the Santa Fe Trail. To celebrate the . . . — Map (db m45529) HM
Ohio (Clark County), Springfield — 4-12 — Pennsylvania House / The National Road
Pennsylvania House David Snively built the Federal-style Pennsylvania House in 1839 along the newly constructed National Road. This tavern and inn was an important stopover for livestock drovers and pioneers traveling by foot, on horseback, or . . . — Map (db m13278) HM
Ohio (Clark County), Springfield — The National Road
A short distance west of the Springfield City limits at the top of Sugar Grove Hill ended the continuous metaled or paved portion of the National Road.

The National Road was, outside of the navigable rivers and harbors, the first great internal . . . — Map (db m45531) HM

Ohio (Franklin County), Bexley — 58-25 — The National Road / The Interurban Electric Railway
The National Road To George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and others, a road to the Ohio Country was essential for the United States’ development. An overland route was the way west for settlers and goods, as well as a means to transport . . . — Map (db m15785) HM
Ohio (Franklin County), Columbus — Broad Street BridgeThe Historic National Road in Ohio
The Broad Street bridge is a significant part of the history of Columbus and the National Road. Until 1816, the only ways to cross the Scioto River were to ford the river during low water or to use the ferry. From 1816 to 1834 a series of wooden . . . — Map (db m96392) HM
Ohio (Franklin County), Columbus — Central High SchoolThe Historic National Road in Ohio
On the west bank of the Scioto River stands the former Central High School, now the core building of the Center of Science and Industry (COSI). The Plan of the City of Columbus, released in 1908, was developed to create a vision for the city in line . . . — Map (db m96393) HM
Ohio (Franklin County), Columbus — Engine House 11The Historic National Road in Ohio
At the turn of the 20th century, three Columbus fire stations were on the National Road, including Station 11 which was built here at 1000 East Main. Construction began in August 1896 and was completed in February 1897 at a cost of $12,863. The cost . . . — Map (db m97465) HM
Ohio (Franklin County), Columbus — 43-25 — The National Road
Side A: After the Revolutionary War, our first President, George Washington, advocated the construction of a road linking cities in the United States from east to west. In 1806, President Thomas Jefferson signed legislation authorizing the . . . — Map (db m34082) HM
Ohio (Franklin County), Reynoldsbirg — Mile MarkersReynoldsbirg — One of Several Identical Markers
The Act of Congress in 1806 which authorized the construction of the National Road required that mile markers be placed at regular intervals. These reference points reassured travelers that they were following the correct route. They also indicated . . . — Map (db m97517) HM
Ohio (Franklin County), Reynoldsburg — ReynoldsburgThe Historic National Road in Ohio — The Birthplace of the Tomato
The eastern portion of Franklin County began to be settled about 1812 when Ohio was still a vast forested wilderness. Transportation moved at a snail’s pace over old Indian trails and natural waterways. 1n 1818 the National Road reached the Ohio . . . — Map (db m96296) HM
Ohio (Franklin County), Whitehall — The Underground RailroadThe Historic National Road in Ohio
The Underground Railroad (UGRR) was neither underground nor a railroad, but a system of loosely connected safe havens where those escaping the brutal conditions of slavery were sheltered, fed, clothed, nursed, concealed, disguised, and instructed . . . — Map (db m96311) HM
Ohio (Franklin County), Whitehall — Whitehall TavernThe Historic National Road in Ohio
The National Road was built through central Ohio in the 1830’s. Robert Brotherton of White Hall, England, purchased 156 acres of land between Alum Creek and Big Walnut Creek in April 1838. This rural property became the site of “Ye Olde . . . — Map (db m96331) HM
Ohio (Guernsey County), Cambridge — “S” Bridge
Old National Road, Built about 1828. Where the road crossed a creek at an angle, a stone arch bridge was built as right angles to the stream flow. "S" shaped walls were then built to guide traffic around the job from the direction of travel across . . . — Map (db m284) HM
Ohio (Guernsey County), Cambridge — CambridgeThe Historic National Road in Ohio
Cambridge was platted in 1806 and became Guernsey County seat just four years later. The town flourished with the construction of the National Road, and by 1834 Cambridge was served daily by four stagecoach lines. Manufacturing boomed after the . . . — Map (db m98595) HM
Ohio (Guernsey County), Cambridge — Peacock RoadThe Historic National Road in Ohio
Named for the peacocks that once lived on a neighboring farm, this narrow brick road was on the National Roads original alignment when it was built through Guernsey County in 1828. Peacock road is typical of the steep grades and sharp curves that . . . — Map (db m98596) HM
Ohio (Guernsey County), Cambridge — Peters Creek Mile MarkerOne of Several Identical Markers
The Act of Congress in 1806 which authorized the construction of the National Road required that mile markers be placed at regular intervals. These reference points reassured travelers that they were following the correct route. They also indicated . . . — Map (db m98507) HM
Ohio (Guernsey County), Cambridge — Peters Creek S-BridgeThe Historic National Road in Ohio
The history of this bridge is tied to Zane’s Trace, the original road through the region. In 1803, the trace crossed Peters Creek, a few hundred yards to the north, using logs to bridge the stream. In 1828, when the National Road was built . . . — Map (db m98505) HM
Ohio (Guernsey County), Old Washington — Old WashingtonHistoric District — The Historic National Road in Ohio
Old Washington was platted along Zane’s Trace in 1805 by the brothers George and Henry Beymer. Within two years twelve log dwellings had been built, making it the oldest settlement in Guernsey County. Originally known as New Washington, the official . . . — Map (db m99047) HM
Ohio (Guernsey County), Salesville — “S” Bridge
Old National Road, Built about 1828. Where the road crossed a creek at an angle, a stone arch bridge was built as right angles to the stream flow. "S" shaped walls were then built to guide traffic around the job from the direction of travel across . . . — Map (db m286) HM
Ohio (Licking County), Etna — EtnaThe Historic National Road in Ohio
Etna Township was formed from Harrison and Lima Townships in 1833. The village of Etna lies in the middle of the township from which it derives its name. Etna was laid out by Lyman Turrill, formerly from Vermont, in 1832 with lots selling for $3.00 . . . — Map (db m97467) HM
Ohio (Licking County), Hebron — 1-45 — Hebron
Located at the crossing of the Ohio and Erie Canal and the National Road, Hebron was a favored commercial and agricultural center for Licking County in the nineteenth century. Only four miles north of the city Governor DeWitt Clinton of New York . . . — Map (db m13878) HM
Ohio (Licking County), Hebron — HebronThe Historic National Road in Ohio — Transportation Crossroad
Where the Water Met the Road While the citizens of St. Clairsville, in eastern Ohio, celebrated the groundbreaking for the National Road on July 4, 1825, construction began on the Ohio & Erie Canal on the same day at Licking Summit (now . . . — Map (db m97542) HM
Ohio (Licking County), Hebron — Hebron MillThe Historic National Road in Ohio
The village of Hebron lost its first mill to a fire in 1881. By the mid 1880’s, a new mill took its place and continued operation into the 1990’s, making it the longest running business in Hebron. by 1891, the Hebron Mill converted from water power . . . — Map (db m97543) HM
Ohio (Licking County), Hebron — Hebron Milling Company
The Hebron Milling Company building was built in 1880 where the National Trail (Route 40) and the Ohio Canal crossed in the village of Hebron. The building sat on the edge of the “turning basin” in the village, where canal boats docked . . . — Map (db m13879) HM
Ohio (Licking County), Kirkersville — KirkersvilleThe Impact of the Interurban — The Historic National Road in Ohio
As a small “pike” town on the National Road, Kirkersville experienced the evolution of transportation from the days of horse and wagon to the automobile. It was the advent of the interurban that not only brought another mode of transit . . . — Map (db m97514) HM
Ohio (Licking County), Kirkersville — Mile MarkersKirkersville — One of Several Identical Markers
The Act of Congress in 1806 which authorized the construction of the National Road required that mile markers be placed at regular intervals. These reference points reassured travelers that they were following the correct route. They also indicated . . . — Map (db m97516) HM
Ohio (Licking County), Thornville — Eagle’s Nest
Old National Road, built 1825, rebuilt 1914 through the efforts of James M. Cox, Governor of Ohio. Columbus 39 ms. Cumberland 720 ms. — Map (db m274) HM
Ohio (Licking County), Thornville — Eagles NestThe Historic National Road in Ohio
For nearly fifty years prior to 1914, almost no maintenance had been carried out on “the pike”, the National Road. By the early 20th century, bicyclists, automobile owners, postal service, and the trucking industry were demanding better . . . — Map (db m98521) HM
Ohio (Madison County), Lafayette — Red Brick TavernThe Historic National Road in Ohio — A Presidential Wayside
The Red Brick Tavern is a classic roadside inn and tavern from the heyday of the National Road. Constructed between 1836 and 1837, it was in operation when the road was completed in front of the building. Brick used in the building was made from . . . — Map (db m96415) HM
Ohio (Madison County), Lafayette — The Anderson HouseThe Historic National Road in Ohio
In 1837, when the National Road was completed through Madison County, the village of Lafayette was platted by William Minter, and this building was a tavern that served travelers. The Red Brick Tavern, which was built after the Anderson House, was . . . — Map (db m96968) HM
Ohio (Madison County), West Jefferson — West JeffersonThe Historic National Road in Ohio
In 1831, Congress passed a bill appropriating money for the extension of the Cumberland Road through Ohio, Indiana and Illinois. In 1836-37 this great National Road was completed through Madison County. At the beginning of the 19th Century, hardly . . . — Map (db m96977) HM
Ohio (Miami County), Brandt — 2-55 — The Old National Road
You are now traveling U.S. 40, the Old National Road, used in the westward expansion of our country. In 1837 notice was given that this section of the road would be constructed. A toll house was located at the east edge of Brandt. — Map (db m28345) HM
Ohio (Miami County), Phoneton — PhonetonThe Historic National Road in Ohio — Communications Center
Originally known as “Phone Town”, this community along the National Road was once a major telecommunications center in America. In 1893, the American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T) selected this site as the location for a . . . — Map (db m96437) HM
Ohio (Montgomery County), Englewood — EnglewoodFounded as Harrisburg- 1841 — The Historic National Road in Ohio
Harrisburg, Ohio, was platted three years after the National Road reached Randolph Township. The name of the town and that of its post office, Iamton, were changed to Englewood in 1899. Located at the intersection of Dayton-Covington Pike and the . . . — Map (db m96499) HM
Ohio (Montgomery County), Englewood — National Road US 40Modern Mile-marker in Englewood, Ohio
National Road US 40 America’s road to the west — Map (db m80737) HM
Ohio (Montgomery County), Vandalia — The Crossroads of AmericaVandalia — The Historic National Road in Ohio
Transportation has played a significant role in Vandalia since the community’s beginnings as a part of Butler Township. In April 1811, a construction contract was awarded for the first 10-mile section of National Road beginning at Cumberland, . . . — Map (db m96487) HM
Ohio (Montgomery County), Vandalia — 10- 57 — The Village of Tadmor / The National Road
The Village of Tadmor The Village of Tadmor is significant as being the location of one of the most important centers of transportation in early Ohio history. As early as 1809, keelboats were poled up river from Dayton to load and unload . . . — Map (db m97813) HM
Ohio (Muskingum County), New Concord — Findley Settlement
Judge David Findley and his sons worked farms which extended from the site of Interstate 70 to the John Glenn High School. Here, on Findley Creek, the Judge erected log houses and built a carding and fulling mill and a tobacco warehouse. Judge . . . — Map (db m279) HM
Ohio (Muskingum County), New Concord — John GlennThe Historic National Road in Ohio
John Glenn, Jr. is a retired U.S. Marine Corps pilot, astronaut, and U.S. Senator. He was born in Cambridge, Ohio, on July 18, 1921, and moved to New Concord when he was two. On February 20, 1962, Glenn flew on the Friendship 7 space mission, . . . — Map (db m98607) HM
Ohio (Muskingum County), New Concord — New ConcordThe Historic National Road in Ohio
In 1827, construction of the National Road began through Muskingum County, and the Scotch-Irish settlement that became New Concord was laid out on March 24, 1828 by Judge David Findley. Judge Findley, born in Belfast, Ireland in 1762, and his six . . . — Map (db m98608) HM
Ohio (Muskingum County), New Concord — 2-60 — S-Bridge
Coaches, Conestoga wagons, herds of livestock, pioneers on foot or horseback, peddlers, soldiers, beggers - these and many others have crossed this bridge on the National Road since 1830. Escaping slaves sought shelter beneath it. Like many others . . . — Map (db m13350) HM
Ohio (Muskingum County), New Concord — 12-60 — Zane's Trace
Side A Fulfilling President George Washington's desire to “open wide the gates of the West,” in 1796 Congress authorized the Zane brothers of Fort Henry (at present day Wheeling) to clear a path through the dense woods of Appalachian . . . — Map (db m13351) HM
Ohio (Muskingum County), Norwich — 15-60 — First Traffic Fatality in Ohio/The National Road
First Traffic Fatality in Ohio As he traveled the National Road on August 20, 1835, the last diary entry by Christopher C. Baldwin, librarian for the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Massachusetts, was, “Start by stage on the . . . — Map (db m13348) HM
Ohio (Muskingum County), Norwich — Mile MarkersNational Road/Zane Grey Museum — One of Several Identical Markers
The Act of Congress in 1806 which authorized the construction of the National Road required that mile markers be placed at regular intervals. These reference points reassured travelers that they were following the correct route. They also indicated . . . — Map (db m97521) HM
Ohio (Muskingum County), Norwich — MotelsThe Historic National Road in Ohio
As motorized transportation developed, motels of all sizes became a fixture along the National Road. Automobile travel in the early 1900s was often an adventure. Overnight accommodations, in the form of hotels, were concentrated in urban . . . — Map (db m98694) HM
Ohio (Muskingum County), Norwich — The Historic National Roadin Ohio
Welcome to the National Road The National road crosses six states from Baltimore, Maryland to East St. Louis, Illinois. The road fulfilled the dreams of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson to build an all-weather route across the . . . — Map (db m93721) HM
Ohio (Muskingum County), Zanesville — Headley InnThe Historic National Road in Ohio
One of the most beautiful and interesting of the old stopping places is the Headley Inn which provided lodging and refreshment for the westward tide of immigration for 30 years. The Headley Inn dreamed half a century away over rooms stored with . . . — Map (db m98983) HM
Ohio (Muskingum County), Zanesville — Nelson T. Gant HouseThe Historic National Road in Ohio
Nelson Talbot Gant was freed from slavery by the last will and testament of his owner, John Nixon, September of 1845 in Loudoun County, Virginia. However, Gant’s wife, Maria, was a slave to Jane Russell of Leesburg, Virginia. According to Virginia . . . — Map (db m43963) HM
Ohio (Muskingum County), Zanesville — Smith House & Farm
Edward Edison Smith was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and arrived in Muskingum County about the same time as his neighbor, Uzal Headley. Smith was a farmer who built a log house near this site and, after the National Road reached Zanesville in . . . — Map (db m98982) HM
Ohio (Muskingum County), Zanesville — 5-60 — Y-Bridge — 1902
World famous part of the Old National Road. Maintained by Muskingum County Marker by Ohio Society of Professional Engineers Approved by the Ohio Historical Society — Map (db m8518) HM
Ohio (Muskingum County), Zanesville — 3-60 — Y-Bridge — 1902
World famous part of the Old National Road. Maintained by Muskingum County. Marker by Ohio Society of Professional Engineers. Approved by the Ohio Historical Society. — Map (db m9555) HM
Ohio (Muskingum County), Zanesville — 4-60 — Y-Bridge — 1902
World famous part of the Old National Road. Maintained by Muskingum County. Marker by Ohio Society of Professional Engineers. Approved by the Ohio Historical Society. — Map (db m9559) HM
Ohio (Muskingum County), Zanesville — Y-BridgeThe Historic National Road in Ohio — A Unique Landmark
On November 16, 1814, the Muskingum Messenger reported, “Muskingum and Licking Bridge, This grand and important work is now possible. Great credit is due to Mr. Rufus Scott, the architect. Now the south and north sides of Licking . . . — Map (db m99037) HM
Ohio (Muskingum County), Zanesville — ZanesvilleThe Historic National Road in Ohio
Zanesville, the county seat of Muskingum County, was named for Colonel Ebenezer Zane. In 1796 Congress commissioned Colonel Zane to build a road from Wheeling, Virginia (later West Virginia) to Limestone, Kentucky (present Maysville, Kentucky). . . . — Map (db m98656) HM
Ohio (Preble County), Lewisburg — EuphemiaThe Historic National Road in Ohio
Construction of the National Road was approaching Preble County in 1830, and the coming of the Road spurred the economic interests of local residents. John Mumma, the county surveyor, decided to purchase 158 acres of farmland for $7,900. He platted . . . — Map (db m96502) HM
Ohio (Preble County), Lewisburg — Welcome to the National RoadThe Historic National Road in Ohio — West Gate
The National Road crosses six states from Baltimore, Maryland to East st. Louis, Illinois. the road fulfilled the dreams of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson to build an all-weather route acros the Allegheny Mountains to connect the Eastern . . . — Map (db m96508) HM
Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Brownsville — Brownsville - Route 40 Bridge
ASM International has designated Brownsville - Route 40 Bridge an historical landmark. This bridge, designed by and built under the supervision of Capt. Richard Delafield in 1839 to improve the "National Road", is the first cast iron bridge to be . . . — Map (db m252) HM
Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Brownsville — Dunlap’s Creek Bridge
An integral part of the National Road, this was the first metal arch bridge in the United States, built 1836-39. Replacing several earlier bridges on this site, including an 1809 Finley suspension bridge, this 80-foot span was built of cast iron by . . . — Map (db m251) HM
Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Brownsville — The First Cast Iron Bridge
The first cast iron bridge built in the United States, was built in 1836-1839 over Dunlap's Creek at this point. — Map (db m253) HM
Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Farmington — Mount Washington Tavern
This tavern once bustled with activity. Judge Nathaniel Ewing of Uniontown built it about 1830, then sold in in 1840 to James Sampey, who ran the tavern with his family. Mount Washington Tavern was a stage stop for the Good Intent Stage Line, one of . . . — Map (db m347) HM
Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Farmington — 2 — National Road
Our first national road; fathered by Albert Gallatin. Begun in 1811 at Cumberland, Md.; completed to Wheeling in 1818. Toll road under State control, 1835-1905. Rebuilt, it is present U.S. Route 40. — Map (db m340) HM
Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Farmington — The National Road
This "National Road" connected east and west in the 1800s. George Washington proposed a route to join the western frontier to the eastern seaboard in the late 1700s. His idea was later promoted by Albert Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury under . . . — Map (db m342) HM
Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Grindstone — 2 — National Road
Our first national road; fathered by Albert Gallatin. Begun in 1811 at Cumberland, Md.; completed to Wheeling in 1818. Toll road under State control, 1835-1905. Rebuilt, it is present U.S. Route 40. — Map (db m256) HM
Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Hopwood — National Road
From the creation of the National Road in 1806 until the advent of the railroads in the 1850s, thousands of travellers crossed Chestnut Ridge between the East and Midwest. Founded in 1791, Hopwood was a major resting stop for traffic in both . . . — Map (db m41796) HM
Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Uniontown — Fayette County
Formed September 26, 1783 from Westmoreland County. Named for the Marquis de Lafayette. Among the French and Indian War sites here is Fort Necessity. The county seat, Uniontown, was incorporated 1796. On the National Road, eventually US Route 40. — Map (db m41786) HM
Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Uniontown — Searight’s Tollhouse
Erected by Pennsylvania, 1835, to collect tolls on the old National Road. Administered by The Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission — Map (db m257) HM
Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Uniontown — Toll House
One of the six original toll houses on the Cumberland or National Road. It was built by the State after the road was turned over to it by the United States in 1835. The road was completed through this section in 1817-1818. — Map (db m41798) HM
Pennsylvania (Fayette County), Uniontown — Uniontown
Founded by Henry Beeson, who built a blockhouse on site of the county jail in 1774. Uniontown gained importance with the building of the National Road after 1811. — Map (db m41799) HM
Pennsylvania (Somerset County), Addison — 2 — National Road
Our first national road; fathered by Albert Gallatin. Begun in 1811 at Cumberland, Md.; completed to Wheeling in 1818. Toll road under State control, 1835-1905. Rebuilt, it is present U.S. Route 40. — Map (db m353) HM
Pennsylvania (Somerset County), Addison — Toll House
One of the six original toll houses on the Cumberland or National Road is on the hill opposite. Built after the road was turned over to the State in 1835 by the U.S.   Restored and preserved by the D.A.R. — Map (db m350) HM
Pennsylvania (Washington County), Beallsville — 10 — Madonna of the Trail
(South Face) N.S.D.A.R. Memorial to the Pioneer Mothers of the Covered Wagon Days. (East Face) On this historic spot, the hunting ground of the friendly Indian Nemacolin, this monument is erected and dedicated to the memory of our pioneer . . . — Map (db m501) HM
Pennsylvania (Washington County), Claysville — “S” Bridge
This stone bridge was part of the National, or Cumberland Road. Originated in 1805, it was completed to Wheeling in 1818. Over it passed countless wagons and stages uniting the East and the growing West. — Map (db m806) HM
Pennsylvania (Washington County), Claysville — Claysville
Claysville has the distinction of being one of the original “pike towns” along the National Road. In 1817, an early settler and land owner, John Purviance, learned that the new National Road, that was being constructed between . . . — Map (db m9372) HM
Pennsylvania (Washington County), Richeyville — Centerville
Beallsville - 4 Centerville Central stopping point between Washington and Uniontown for stagecoaches. Founded 1821 — Map (db m5017) HM
Pennsylvania (Washington County), Scenery Hill — Hill’s Tavern
This tavern, in continuous operation since 1794 when it was opened by Stephen Hill, is one of the oldest on the National Road. It was a popular stop for stage coaches and waggoners. — Map (db m255) HM
Pennsylvania (Washington County), Washington — National Road
Our first national road; fathered by Albert Gallatin. Begun in 1811 at Cumberland, Md.; completed to Wheeling in 1818. Toll road under State control, 1835-1905. Rebuilt, it is present U.S. Route 40. — Map (db m816) HM
Pennsylvania (Washington County), Washington — Washington
Laid out in 1781 by John and William Hoge. Site of Indian Catfish Camp. Boro charter, 1810; city, 1823. National Road center and rich in historic buildings and associations. Named for George Washington. — Map (db m258) HM
West Virginia (Ohio County), Roneys Point — Roney’s Point
Here is located the historic “Heimberger House,” one of the first and most famous of the numerous stopping places which sprang up to server the traffic on the National Road. Still standing, it is now called the “Old Stone . . . — Map (db m66677) HM
West Virginia (Ohio County), Wheeling — Elm Grove Stone Bridge
Built in 1817 by Moses Shepherd, a prominent Ohio Countian, as part of the National Road. Constructed of uncoursed limestone, but covered by concrete in 1958, it is the oldest extant three span elliptical arch bridge in the state. Also known as . . . — Map (db m64226) HM
West Virginia (Ohio County), Wheeling — Madonna of the Trail
(South Face) N.S.D.A.R. Memorial to the Pioneer Mothers of the Covered Wagon Days. (East Face) To the pioneer mothers of our mountain state, whose courage, optimism, live and sacrifice made possible the National Highway that united east . . . — Map (db m498) HM
West Virginia (Ohio County), Wheeling — Monument Place
On site of Fort Shepherd is this mansion, built in 1798 by Moses Shepherd and known as Shepherd Hall. Among its guests were Lafayette, James K. Polk, Andrew Jackson, and Henry Clay. Clay's support brought National Pike here. — Map (db m750) HM
West Virginia (Ohio County), Wheeling — The Madonna of the Trail
The statue before you was created as a tribute to the pioneer women who braved the uncertainties of the great journey west. The Madonna memorials were a project of the Daughters of the American Revolution and were dedicated between 1926 and 1929. . . . — Map (db m500) HM
West Virginia (Ohio County), Wheeling — The National Pike
The National Pike, called the “Old Cumberland Road” , was started in 1811 and used to Wheeling in 1817 and by mail coaches from Washington by 1818. Most of it followed the Nemacolin Path and Braddock’s Road from Cumberland, Md. — Map (db m512) HM
West Virginia (Ohio County), Wheeling — Wheeling Suspension Bridge - 1849
In 1816, with a strong interest in internal improvements, the legislatures of Virginia and Ohio authorized the formation of the Wheeling and Belmont Bridge Company (Belmont because the bridge company was to connect from Wheeling, Virginia to Belmont . . . — Map (db m561) HM

181 markers matched your search criteria.
Paid Advertisement