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Trail of Tears Historical Markers

The Indian Removal Act of 1830 opened a dark chapter in American history. Thousands of Native-Americans died during their forced removal from their eastern homelands to the Oklahoma Territory, along what is now called the Trail of Tears.
 
History of Sheffield Marker (side 2) image, Touch for more information
By Sandra Hughes, September 6, 2010
History of Sheffield Marker (side 2)
Alabama (Colbert County), Sheffield — History of Sheffield
Side A Prehistoric man arrived in this area bout 10,000 years ago. Later Indian cultures left many stone artifacts and pottery vessels. In the 1780s, a French trading post and Indian village were located near the mouth of Spring Creek. . . . — Map (db m83389) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — American Indian History
Side 1 Oka Kapassa (Ococoposa), meaning "Cold Water", was the Chickasaw name given to Spring Creek and to a trading post established near the Tennessee River about 1780. About 1817, Michael Dickerson and others were greeted at what by . . . — Map (db m83393) HM
Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — Sacred TearsBy Branko Medenica — September 19, 2003
Panel 1 Tuscumbia and much of the Shoals area played an integral part in the "Trail of Tears" with the Tennessee River route and the overland routes. In 1825, the U.S. Government formally adopted a removal policy, which was carried out . . . — Map (db m83403) HM
Alabama (DeKalb County), Fort Payne — Cherokee Indian Removal
Under the provisions of the Cherokee Removal Act of 1830, a log stockade was built, “Two hundred yards Northeast of Big Spring.” The spring supplied abundant water for the Cherokees, the soldiers and livestock. Fort Payne was used as . . . — Map (db m36743) HM
Alabama (DeKalb County), Fort Payne — Fort Payne Cabin Historic Site
In 1837 Federal Troops arrived in this area to select a fort location for the collection, holding and removal of the Cherokee. Part of a much larger compound, this site contained a cabin seized by the troops for use as part of the fort. Today a . . . — Map (db m100286) HM
Alabama (DeKalb County), Fort Payne — Site of the Willstown Mission1823-1839
Also resting place of Supt Ard Hoyt 1770-1828 Missionary to the Cherokee Indians Here and at Brainerd 1818-1828 — Map (db m36965) HM
Alabama (Jackson County), Rocky Springs — Trail of Tears
In May 1838 soldiers, under the command of U.S. Army General Winfield Scott, began rounding up Cherokee Indians in this area who had refused to move to Indian Territory in Oklahoma. About 16,000 Cherokees were placed in stockades in . . . — Map (db m18047) HM
Alabama (Lauderdale County), Waterloo — Trail of Tears
Thousands of Cherokee Indians passed through Waterloo in the 1830s when they were forced by the U.S. government to move West on the "Trail of Tears". Most came by boat from Tuscumbia and camped here to await transfer to larger steamboats. During the . . . — Map (db m84301) HM
Alabama (Lawrence County), Town Creek — Trail of Tears
Form the late 1700's to 1807 a Cherokee Chief named Doublehead guarded this area, that was claimed by both the Cherokee and Chickasaw Nations as sacred hunting grounds against encroachment of white settlers. Chief Doublehead had the reputation of . . . — Map (db m84646) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Brownsboro — Trail of TearsDrane/Hood Overland Route
In May 1838 soldiers, under the command of U.S. Army General Winfield Scott, began rounding up Cherokee Indians in this area who had refused to move to Indian Territory in Oklahoma. About 16,000 Cherokees were placed in stockades in Tennessee and . . . — Map (db m33318) HM
Alabama (Madison County), Madison — Trail of TearsDrane Overland Route
Early in the 1800's gold was found from Virginia to Alabama including a rich belt on Cherokee Indian land in what is now Dahlonega, GA. causing a huge influx of miners and a land grab by new settlers. Pressure and greed from politicians led to . . . — Map (db m85838) HM
Alabama (Marshall County), Guntersville — History of Guntersville
(Side A) This area's proximity to the Tennessee River and Indian trails made it a crossroads for early habitation, settlement, and trade. Archaeological studies reveal it was first inhabited about 12,000 years ago by Paleo-Indians. They . . . — Map (db m33305) HM
Alabama (Russell County), Fort Mitchell — The Creek Trail of Tears
Approximately one mile due east of this marker, back down the Old Federal Road, called by frontiersmen and Indians the Three Notched Trail or the Three Chopped Way, stood Fort Mitchell, an early 19th century American fort that in 1836 was one of the . . . — Map (db m26100) HM
Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — “The Indian Fires Are Going Out”
The Trail of Tears led thousands of Creek Indians through Tuscaloosa, capital of Alabama in 1836. Chief Eufaula addressed the legislature with these words: "I come here, brothers, to see the great house of Alabama and the men who make laws and . . . — Map (db m28995) HM
Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — John GayleGovernor 1831 - 1835
He extended state laws into Indian lands and actively encouraged illegal white settlement there. A treaty with the Creek Indians in 1832 forced them to leave the state and resulted in nine new counties in east Alabama. Their "Trail of Tears" took . . . — Map (db m29028) HM
Arkansas (Baxter County), Mountain Home — Old Military Road
About 1800 near this spot white man established the first trail from East to West across Baxter County. Later some of the Cherokee Indians were moved to Oklahoma using this route which was known as the Trail of Tears. — Map (db m62248) HM
Arkansas (Benton County), Garfield — Pea Ridge and the Trail of TearsTrail of Tears National Historic Trail — National Trails System
"Decr 23rd 1837, Buried Rainfrogs daughter. Marched at 8 o'c A.M. halted at Reddix, 3 o'c. P.M. encamped and issued corn & fodder & beef, 16 miles today. -B.B. Cannon, Detachment Leader Not Far to Go Here, members of William . . . — Map (db m21085) HM
Arkansas (Benton County), Garfield — They Passed This WayTrail of Tears National Historic Trail — National Trails System
"Long time we travel on way to new land.... Womens cry... Children cry and men cry...but they say nothing and just put heads down and keep on go towards West. Many days pass and people die very much." -Recollection of a survivor of the Trail of . . . — Map (db m35436) HM
Arkansas (Faulkner County), Conway — "Trail of Tears"
After Congress passed the Indian Removal Act, May 28, 1830, the Government forceably relocated about 60,000 Indians from the southeastern U.S. to what is now Oklahoma. This included the five (5) civilized tribes Cherokee, Chickasaw, Creek, Choctaw, . . . — Map (db m97912) HM
Arkansas (Phillips County), Helena — Helena and The Trail of Tears
"The steamer Warren brought news... of the loss of the steamboat Monmouth, and the death of at least one-half of her infamously crowded passengers. This fatal, and most appalling, accident arose from a collision between these two boats; but from the . . . — Map (db m52028) HM
Arkansas (Phillips County), Helena — They Passed This WayThe Trail of Tears - Water Route
"I have no more land, I am driven away from home, driven up the red waters, let us all go, let us all die together and somewhere upon the banks we will be there." - Sin-e-cha's Song, heard on several removal boats along the Trail of . . . — Map (db m52027) HM
Arkansas (Saline County), Benton — Quapaws, Choctaws, and Chickasaws Passed Here1825 - 1837
The Indian parties followed an ancient trail that became known as the Southwest Trail. The primitive trail took the tribal groups by where you are standing. William S. Lockhart was the first permanent settler in the area, arriving in 1815, at a . . . — Map (db m96596) HM
Georgia (Dade County), Wildwood — 041-2 — Chief Wauhatchie’s Home
Just East of the railroad from here and 200 yards North of Wauhatchie Spring and Branch, stood the home of Wauhatchie, Chief of the Cherokees. In the War of 1812 he served in a company of Cherokees under Capt. John Brown, Col. Gideon Morgan and Maj. . . . — Map (db m57996) HM
Georgia (Floyd County), Rome — 57-1 — Chieftains
At this house’s core is the 1790s log home of Major Ridge (c.1771-1839), a leader in the Cherokee Nation. His 223-acre plantation supported numerous outbuildings, orchards and slaves while the family served as ferryboat operators and merchants. It . . . — Map (db m14981) HM
Georgia (Gilmer County), East Ellijay — Fort Hetzel1838 — 1868
In 1838, 1100 Cherokee Indians were assembled at this site in preparation for the evacuation to Oklahoma Territory on The Trail of Tears — Map (db m98987) HM
Georgia (Gilmer County), Ellijay — Home of Chief Whitepath
Home of the Cherokee Indian Chief Whitepath stood from 1800 to 1982, 338 yards S.W. of this marker. Aaron Pinson born Feb. 5, 1784 lived here from 1838 until his death Dec. 7, 1843 — Map (db m98998) HM
Georgia (Gordon County), Adairsville — 064-32 — Cherokee Nation
During the early 1800’s, northern Georgia was heart of the sovereign, independent Cherokee Indian Nation. By this time Cherokee were the most progressive Indian tribe in North America. In 1821, they became the first American Indians with a written . . . — Map (db m11567) HM
Georgia (Gordon County), Calhoun — 064-33 — Trail of Tears
The New Echota Treaty of 1835 relinquished Cherokee Indian claims to lands east of the Mississippi River. The majority of the Cherokee people considered the treaty fraudulent and refused to leave their homelands in Georgia, Alabama, North Carolina, . . . — Map (db m10051) HM
Georgia (Lumpkin County), Dahlonega — 093-6 — The Station<---------<<<
This is the site of one the forts or stations used by the United States Government in Cherokee country in 1838 to round up the Cherokee Indians for their removal to western reservations. General Winfield Scott, commander of the troops used to . . . — Map (db m30369) HM
Georgia (Murray County), Chatsworth — 105-4 — Chief Vann House
Built of locally made brick in 1804, this house, the finest in the Cherokee Nation, was the home a Town Chief, James Vann, son of a Scotch trader, Clement Vann, and his wife, a Cherokee chieftain's daughter. Around his home were several of his . . . — Map (db m18595) HM
Georgia (Murray County), Spring Place — John Howard Payne
Author of "Home,Sweet Home," suspected as a spy of the Cherokee Indians was imprisoned here in 1835, but released. Erected by Old Guard of Atlanta Oct. 6, 1922; Jos. A. McCord; Commandant — Map (db m18592) HM
Georgia (Walker County), LaFayette — 146-1 — Fort Cumming
Here stood a Cherokee Indian stockade with blockhouse on hill, built by U.S. Government in 1836. Capt. Samuel Fariss and a company of Georgia volunteers guarded Cherokee Indians here before their removal to the west. This fort was . . . — Map (db m12907) HM
Georgia (Walker County), Rossville — 146-12 — John Ross Home
This comfortable two-story log house was the home of Cherokee Chief John Ross from boyhood until he went west over the "Trail of Tears," losing his Indian wife enroute. Although only one-eighth Indian himself, Ross was the elected "Principal Chief" . . . — Map (db m12673) HM
Georgia (White County), Helen — 154-6 — Early Trading Post
At this point, just north of the safest ford in the Chattahoochee River, the first white settlers in this area built their campfires in 1822. A trading post was soon established on the site and Indians traded gold nuggets and gold-dust to the . . . — Map (db m43704) HM
Kentucky (Christian County), Hopkinsville — Cherokee "Trail of Tears"
By the early 1800's white settlers in present-day Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee wanted the Cherokee farms, especially after the discovery of gold on Cherokee land. In 1830 the U. S. Congress passed the Indian Removal Act; in 1835 three hundred . . . — Map (db m105690) HM
Kentucky (Christian County), Hopkinsville — The Cherokee A Civilized People
The Cherokee people once occupied much of the mid-Atlantic territory of North America. During the American Revolution they sided with the British against encroaching settlers and were forced to live in the mountains of Georgia, Tennessee, and North . . . — Map (db m105691) HM
Kentucky (Christian County), Hopkinsville — Whitepath and Fly Smith
Chief Whitepath served with Chief John Ross on the six-person Management Committee for Cherokee Removal and Subsistence, arranging for ration stops along the "Trail of Tears".

Cherokee Memorial Park in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, was one of the . . . — Map (db m105687) HM

Missouri (Laclede County), Lebanon — Lebanon
Lebanon, lying 1,265 feet above sea level, in Missouri's Central Ozarks, was founded in 1849 as the seat of newly organized Laclede County. Southern settlers named the town for Lebanon, Tenn. The county name honors the founder of St. Louis. When . . . — Map (db m44872) HM
Missouri (Randolph County), Huntsville — Trail of Death
On October 17 & 18, 1838 about 850 Pottawatomie Indians camped near Huntsville, on their way from northern Indiana to Kansas; a forced march accompanied by soldiers. Having traveled 13 miles in cold rain, a flooded camp caused them to stay a second . . . — Map (db m96113) HM
North Carolina (Cherokee County), Murphy — Q-11 — Fort Butler
One of forts in which Gen. Winfield Scott gathered the Cherokee before moving them west in 1838. Stood ¼ mile southwest. — Map (db m57945) HM
North Carolina (Cherokee County), Murphy — Site of Fort Butler
Commanded by Genl. Winfield Scott during the round up of the Cherokee Indians for removal to Oklahoma in 1837-1838 — — — — — — — Donated to Town of Murphy by Tar Heel . . . — Map (db m99008) HM
North Carolina (Clay County), Hayesville — Q15 — Fort Hembree
One of the forts where General Winfield Scott's United States Forces gathered the Cherokee before moving them west, stood 3/4 mi. N. W. — Map (db m41936) HM
North Carolina (Swain County), Bryson City — Q-3 — Tsali
Cherokee who resisted removal & escaped from U.S. troops; executed nearby, 1838. Story inspired Unto These Hills.Map (db m39694) HM
North Carolina (Swain County), Cherokee — People of the Mountains
The rugged terrain of the Smoky Mountains determined patterns of human settlement. Residents of the Smokies - be they native Cherokees or European emigrants and their descendants - gravitated to valleys or coves. Settlement was confined to areas far . . . — Map (db m20054) HM
Oklahoma (Caddo County), Anadarko — Sequoyah
Cherokee - - - 1764-1843 Artist and tribal leader Famous inventor of the Cherokee Alphabet Sculptor Leonard McMurry — Map (db m28103) HM
Oklahoma (Cherokee County), Park Hill — Trail of Tears
(front) The United States Government, unable to conclude an agreement with the duly authorized leaders of the Cherokee Nation, signed a treaty with a minority faction willing to cede the last remaining portion of the original Cherokee . . . — Map (db m77932) HM
Oklahoma (McCurtain County), Broken Bow — 203 — Military Road - Choctaw Trail of Tears
Cut from Washington, Ark., to Fort Towson in 1831 for removal of Choctaws from Miss., became known as Choctaw Trail of Tears after thousands of suffering Indians used it to reach new lands. Road served as major east-west artery for Choctaw Nation . . . — Map (db m24398) HM
Tennessee (Bradley County), Cleveland — 2A-92 — Cooper Cemetery
In 1873, Bennet Cooper (1797-1886) gave one-quarter of an acre of land for a family burying ground. His first wife, Lydia, was buried there along with several other family members. The cemetery is located on a ridge behind the Cooper Homeplace which . . . — Map (db m81367) HM
Tennessee (Giles County), Pulaski — Giles County Trail of Tears Memorial
"Long time we travel on way to new land...Womens cry... Children cry and men cry... but they say nothing and just put heads down and keep go towards West. Many days pass and people die very much." -Recollection of a survivor of the Trail of . . . — Map (db m29815) HM
Tennessee (Giles County), Pulaski — Nunahi-Duna-Dlo-Hily-I"The Trail Where They Cried"
This sculpture is a small piece of theater, a tableau to engage the spectator in the heartbreak of the Cherokee walking west on the two routes of the Trail of Tears that crossed in Pulaski. Fear, suffering, survival, and resolve are expressed within . . . — Map (db m81562) HM
Tennessee (Giles County), Pulaski — The Bell RouteThe Trail of Tears
Bell's Route of the Cherokee Trail of Tears in Tennessee, Arkansas, and Oklahoma, 1838-1839 Overview The detachment headed by John Bell differed from the parties under Cherokee Chief John Ross's supervision. Bell's detachment was composed of . . . — Map (db m29811) HM
Tennessee (Giles County), Pulaski — The Benge RouteThe Trail of Tears
John Benge's Route of the Cherokee Trail of Tears in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma, 1838-1839 John Benge led one detachment of approximately 1100 Cherokee with 60 wagons and 600 horses that left from Alabama on . . . — Map (db m29812) HM
Tennessee (Giles County), Pulaski — The Trail of Tears Interpretive Center
The Trail of Tears Interpretive Center Popularly known as the Rock Church, this beautiful chapel of Gothic architectural design was constructed by native limestone and was dedicated as the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church on August 10, 1941. A . . . — Map (db m29810) HM
Tennessee (Giles County), Pulaski — Trail of TearsBell and Benge Removal Routes
The 1830 Indian Removal Act mandated the removal of all American Indian Tribes East of the Mississippi River to lands in the West. Pulaski, Tennessee is where the Bell and Benge routes crossed in 1838. Benge's route left Fort Payne, AL on September . . . — Map (db m81601) HM
Tennessee (Hamilton County), Chattanooga — 1790 John Ross 1866
John Ross was the grandson of John McDonald and the son of Daniel Ross natives of Scotland and partners in a trading post established at Ross’s Landing. He dedicated himself to the education of the Cherokee Nation. JOHN ROSS is called the greatest . . . — Map (db m36278) HM
Tennessee (Hamilton County), Chattanooga — 1838 Cherokee Removal & Trail of Tears
In May 1836, the United States Senate ratified the Treaty of New Echota by the margin of a single vote and set in motion the forcible removal of the Cherokee nation to the west. In 1838, the U.S. Government removed more than 16,000 Cherokee and . . . — Map (db m69239) HM
Tennessee (Hamilton County), Chattanooga — Crossing into History
Trail of Tears In 1838, nearly 2,000 Cherokee, their enslaved Africans, and others stopped at Brown's Ferry (a few yards to your left) and gazed across the Tennessee River toward the landing on the opposite bank. They must . . . — Map (db m84250) HM
Tennessee (Hamilton County), Chattanooga — Trail of Tears
In May 1838 soldiers, under the command of Gen. Winfield Scott, began rounding up Cherokee Indians in this area who had refused to move to Indian Territory (Oklahoma). About 15,000 Cherokees were placed in stockades in Tennessee and Alabama until . . . — Map (db m81675) HM
Tennessee (Hardin County), Savannah — Historic Crossing
Savannah stands at the junction of two major corridors- the north-south Tennessee River and the east-west road of Memphis. Savannah's secure, high ground and deep water made it an important port. For decades pioneers and area farmers found the water . . . — Map (db m103113) HM
Tennessee (Lawrence County), Lawrenceburg — Retracing the Trail of Tears
The Bell Route On October 11, 1838, 660 Cherokee led by John Adair Bell left from Fort Cass (present day Charleston, Tennessee) to begin an arduous 700-mile journey. Weak and miserable from being held in removal camps, the people in the Bell . . . — Map (db m108202) HM
Tennessee (Lawrence County), Lawrenceburg — They Passed This Way
Long time we travel on way to new land… Womens cry…Children Cry and men cry…but they say nothing and just put heads down and keep on go towards West. Many days pass and people die very much. Recollection of a survivor of the Trail of . . . — Map (db m108204) HM
Tennessee (Lawrence County), Lawrenceburg — Trail of TearsBell Removal Route
The Indian Removal Act of 1830 mandated the removal of all American Indian tribes east of the Mississippi River to lands in the west. The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail commemorates the removal of the Cherokee and the paths that 17 . . . — Map (db m63079) HM
Tennessee (Lincoln County), Fayetteville — Bell's Route Trail of TearsMemphis-Lincoln Co.-Chattanooga
During 1837 and 1838, a forced removal plan of the native people was implemented consisting of the removal of the tribal people of Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole.

Lieutenant Edward Deas, escorted one of the last groups to be . . . — Map (db m75213) HM

Tennessee (McNairy County), Selmer — 4C 40 — The Trail of TearsCherokee Removal — 1838
A group of approximately 660 Cherokees traveled through McNairy County in late fall of 1838. Also called Bell's Treaty Party, it was the only detachment to be accompanied by the military. Escorted by U.S. Army Lt. Edward Deas and Cherokee leader . . . — Map (db m19311) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — "A Desire to Possess"
In 1830, President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act. It ended the century long treaty relation that had defined Anglo-American, Cherokee relations. The debates that preceded the removal legislation set off fierce debates. Public opinion . . . — Map (db m39497) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — "An immense amount of suffering"
As they trudged westward, the parties that left Blythe's Ferry in the early fall of 1838 endured lingering health problems from diseases, such as diarrhea, dysentery, measles, and whooping cough, which began during their long stay in stockades. . . . — Map (db m39538) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — "Chains of Friendship"
The Cherokee people made their homes in the river valleys that spread out of the southern Appalachian Mountains. They claimed a domain that stretched across present-day North and South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama. They also claimed hunting . . . — Map (db m39494) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — "Farewell to our native land"
In addition to losing their land to the American government, many Cherokees fell prey to robbers and thieves who operated near the camps and along the roads leading west. "We are now about to take our final leave and kind farewell to our native . . . — Map (db m39532) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — "Forced from this country"
In hopes of avoiding bloodshed, American military leaders made one final appeal to the Cherokee people. It contained both promises of protection and threats of doom. The President, as well as Congress, have decreed that you should remove from . . . — Map (db m39499) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — "Given by the Great Spirit above"
During the 18th century, Cherokees worked hard to defend their homeland from invasion by Anglo-Americans. The nature of Cherokee politics - dispersed and locally defined - often hampered unified resistance to the invaders. In 1809, the Cherokee . . . — Map (db m39495) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — "Not a treaty at all"
Although American legislation declared an end to Cherokee sovereignty, most of those remaining in the Nation continued to resist. In December 1835, however, a small party of Cherokee signed the Treaty of New Echota. The agreement promised that the . . . — Map (db m39498) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — "Orders No. 25"Gen. Winfield Scott's Proclamation to the Cherokee People — ~10 May 1838~
Cherokees! The President of the United States has sent me with a powerful army, to cause you, in obedience to the treaty of 1835, to join that part of your people who have already established in prosperity on the other side of the Mississippi. . . . — Map (db m39491) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — "The People were over"
Moving the thousand's of people and about 5,000 horses and 500 wagons across the Tennessee River at Blythe's Ferry proved slow. Some crossings took as long as three days. "I reached Blythe's ferry on Sunday evening last, and found the great body . . . — Map (db m39536) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — "They drove us out of our house"
Beginning on May 26, 1838, soldiers began rounding up Cherokee women, men, and children. They showed little concern or respect for families or their property. In the first days, confusion abounded as soldiers and militiamen gathered individuals . . . — Map (db m39530) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — "To Learn and not Forget"
In the spring of 1838, American military forces evicted the Cherokee Nation from its homeland. Nearly 16,000 women, men, and children - including nearly five hundred Muskogee Creek Indians, and slaves belonging to Cherokee owners -- were forced from . . . — Map (db m39492) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — "To Learn and not Forget"
"The Trail of Tears was a tragedy for a progressive and independent people whose population was markedly decreased as a result of the hardships associated with lengthy confinements and a lengthy arduous journey. The forced Removal left an . . . — Map (db m39540) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — "Very loth to go on"
The detachments approached Walden's Ridge within days of leaving Blythe's Ferry. The climb up the mountain proved difficult. Supplying food to both people and animals became a major problem. Particular hardship accompanied the climb up Walden's . . . — Map (db m39537) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — "Your Fate is Decided"
Both the Indian Removal Act of 1830 and the Treaty of New Echota aimed to accomplish removal through voluntary emigration. Such efforts largely failed and by 1838 only about 2,000 Cherokee affected by the treaty had moved west. For those remaining, . . . — Map (db m39493) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — "Your Fate is Decided"
Both the Indian Removal Act of 1830 and the Treaty of New Echota aimed to accomplish removal through voluntary emigration. Such efforts largely failed and by 1838 only about 2,000 Cherokee affected by the treaty had moved west. For those remaining, . . . — Map (db m39529) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — 2B 33 — Blythe Ferry
Around 1809, William Blythe, a Cherokee, established a ferry at this site to provide transportation for the settlers to the west and the Cherokees to the east. During the 1838 Trail of Tears, it was an important crossing, and it played a military . . . — Map (db m39468) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — Blythe Ferry
One of the worst acts of "man's inhumanity" took place when an entire race of peoples were driven from their lands in 1838. It was here at Blythe Ferry that approx. 9000 Cherokees and Creeks camped while waiting to cross the Tennessee River on their . . . — Map (db m39469) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — 2B 32 — Blythe Ferry
Around 1809, William Blythe, a Cherokee, established a ferry at this site to provide transportation for the settlers to the west and the Cherokees to the east. During the 1838 Trail of Tears, it was an important crossing, and it played a military . . . — Map (db m62612) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — Blythe's Ferry
Nine detachments ranging in size from 729 to 1,766 individuals began crossing the Tennessee River at Blythe's Ferry in October, 1838. Cherokee leaders, called conductors, Hair Conrad, Elijah Hicks, Reverend Jesse Bushyhead, Situwakee, Captain Old . . . — Map (db m82269) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — Cherokee Control
Throughout the spring and summer of 1838 Principal Chief John Ross and a group of Cherokee delegates negotiated with the United States War Department to take control of conducting the parties west. Just as the first groups departed under United . . . — Map (db m82270) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — Cherokee Syllabary
By the beginning of the 19th century, many Cherokee had adopted many white ways of living. They built American type farms, wore American style clothes, developed American style systems of government and began buying African slaves to work on . . . — Map (db m82271) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — General Winfield Scott
General Winfield Scott followed John Wool (1836-1837) and William Lindsay (1837-1838) as commander of Federal troops in the Cherokee nation. Scott arrived at New Echota, Cherokee Nation on April 16, 1838 and assumed command of the "Army of the . . . — Map (db m39454) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — Letters from Blythe's Ferry
Sir The several detachments of Emigrating Cherokees under the charge of Messrs. Hair Conrad, Elijah Hicks, John Benge, Jesse Bushyhead, Sitewakee, James D. Wofford, Stephen Foreman, & Moses Daniel having signified their readiness for the road will . . . — Map (db m39535) HM
Tennessee (Meigs County), Birchwood — Remaking a Nation
Upon arrival in the western territory, the Cherokee emigrants settled among several thousand Cherokee Old Settlers. Relations proved rocky and a generation of conflict followed. Despite the tensions the Cherokee began to rebuild their lives and . . . — Map (db m39539) HM
Tennessee (Monroe County), Tellico Plains — Unicoi Turnpike TrailPath Through Time
The path now known as the Unicoi Turnpike Trail has existed for over 1,000 year. The earliest European maps of the area note the trail as a connector between Cherokee Territories and the coastal ports of Charleston and Savannah. In 1756 British . . . — Map (db m82299) HM WM
Tennessee (Monroe County), Vonore — Cherokee Heritage TrailsTsalagi Usdi Nvnohi
Cherokee Heritage Trails (Tsalagi Usdi Nvnohi) wind through the mountains of North Carolina, Tennessee, and Georgia, in the heart of Cherokee homelands that once encompassed more than 140,000 square miles. Here, where Cherokee people have lived for . . . — Map (db m75440) HM
Tennessee (Monroe County), Vonore — Unicoi Turnpike Trail
The path now known as the Unicoi Turnpike Trail has existed for over 1,000 years. The earliest European maps of the area note the trail as a connector between Cherokee Territories and the coastal ports of Charleston and Savannah. In 1756 British . . . — Map (db m82302) HM WM
Tennessee (Monroe County), Vonore — Unicoi Turnpike TrailA Path Through Time
The path now known as the Unicoi Turnpike Trail has existed for over 1,000 years. The earliest European maps of the area note the trail as a connector between Cherokee Territories and the coastal ports of Charleston and Savannah. In 1756 British . . . — Map (db m82303) HM
Tennessee (Rhea County), Dayton — 2B 28 — Smith’s Crossroads
Named for pioneer settler William Smith, a New England teacher and merchant, who settled here in 1820, it was the junction of the Kiuka War Trace (later Black Fox Trail) to the Cumberland and the main north-south Indian trail to the Great Lakes. . . . — Map (db m4053) HM
Tennessee (Rutherford County), Murfreesboro — 3A 162 — Black Fox Camp Spring
1/2 mi. east were the hunting grounds of Cherokee Chief Black Fox, Inali. On Sept. 7, 1794, Ore's Expedition overpowered Black Fox at the spring. According to legend, to avoid capture Black Fox leaped into the spring and emerged from Murfree Spring, . . . — Map (db m82337) HM
Tennessee (Rutherford County), Murfreesboro — Passing Through Murfreesboro
In fall 1818, over 11,000 Cherokee in nine organized groups passed by here as they continued on their Trail of Tears toward Indian Territory in the West. The Cherokee had been traveling for a few weeks but had already crossed the Tennessee River and . . . — Map (db m90694) HM
Tennessee (Rutherford County), Murfreesboro — They Passed This WayTrail of Tears National Historic Trail-National Trails System — Stones River National Battlefield
After the passage of the Indian Removal Act of 1830, the United States government forced tens of thousands of American Indians to leave their ancestral lands in the southeast for new homes in Indian Territory (present-day Oklahoma). They traveled . . . — Map (db m69123) HM WM
Tennessee (Van Buren County), Spencer — 2C 19 — Trail of TearsCirca 1838
On October 20, 1837, B. B. Cannon with a group of 365 treaty party Cherokees camped near here on their way to the Indian Territory in present-day Oklahoma. Rainey’s Turnpike crossed here at the old John Fleming farm and in 1838 was one route used . . . — Map (db m3626) HM

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